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Archive for May 2016

ODE TO TARAGO CARCAMERA OBSCURA

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Just turned 500,000 kms on the Hay Plains near Balranald, NSW

Just turned 500,000 kms on the Hay Plains near Balranald, NSW

 

 

Today I was just remembering when I first bought

the Tarago as a new car…

It was a smooth car/van in 1986 even though it was a 1985 model.

… I was its sole owner

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Although Doug was a major driver and sharer of the running costs

then there are all those kilometers we three have travelled

Doug, Me and Tarago….

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We have travelled, camped, forded flooded creeks, pushed through tracks that only

four wheel drives should go, crossed the sea (Tasmania), been invaded by possums,

carried our art, groceries, garden waste, house moving, friends, family,

and even a tour group of Japanese tourists,

Dodged kangaroos except for one that jumped into the side of us,

driven through bull dust without getting bogged,

though – monsoonal rains,

locust plagues, searing heat,

snow, sleet and frost, wild winds,

And beautiful spring days …

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Dodged crazy drivers that were talking on mobile phones while simultaneously writing

in a book resting on the steering wheel!!!!

And then there was that really big spider that walked across the windscreen while I was driving…

was it inside or outside – not sure where that ended up?

The Tarago survived break-ins back in the Imagery Gallery days in Fish Lane …

There were the breakdowns… we all have so why not CarCamera Obscura Tarago?

But Treg… you always got her going again – Thank you so much …

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Tarago suffered our singing along with the old cassette tapes

of the Travelling Wilburys, George Harrison and Pink Floyd

We planned, we imagined, we argued, we laughed, we cried, we did many things

We ate fish and chips on the Great Ocean Road …

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We made the car into a camera obscura! And drove it across Australia …

Just as we celebrated 630,000 km …

the journey for our Tarago was to end….

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We said our farewells – April 10, 2016

The Tarago CarCamera Obscura will be auctioned we were told…

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A PICTURE STORY OF OUR TARAGO CARCAMERA OBSCURA

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Wooli Camera Obscura with the Tarago

Wooli Camera Obscura with the Tarago

TRAVELLING LIGHT-Invitation from the Qld Centre for Photography show

TRAVELLING LIGHT-Invitation from the Qld Centre for Photography show

630,000 km - the final reading

630,000 km – the final reading

Frontpiece for the Photospace exhibition at the Australian National University

Frontpiece for the Photospace exhibition at the Australian National University

Transcontinental Crossing graphic

Transcontinental Crossing graphic

The CarCamera Obscura in the Ottway Ranges

The CarCamera Obscura in the Ottway Ranges

The Tarago at the Combo Water Holes near Winton

The Tarago at the Combo Water Holes near Winton

The CarCamera Obscura folio was a finalist in the LEICA CCP Photodocumentary Awards

The CarCamera Obscura folio was a finalist in the LEICA CCP Photodocumentary Awards

CarCamera Obscura graphic - how it works...

CarCamera Obscura graphic – how it works…

The CarCamera photographed as a projection @ Bundanon in 2007

The CarCamera photographed as a projection @ Bundanon in 2007

A CarCamera Obscura on the Barkly Tablelands 2005

A CarCamera Obscura on the Barkly Tablelands 2005

Negotiating a hairpin bend at Mt Buffalo, Victoria

Negotiating a hairpin bend at Mt Buffalo, Victoria

 

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SLQ – 2016 SIGANTO FOUNDATION ARTISTS’ BOOK SERIES

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Post event resfreshments on level 5 of the SLQ

Post event refreshments on level 5 of the SLQ

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CELEBRATING ARTISTS’ BOOKS @ THE STATE LIBRARY OF QLD

The Program: The Siganto Foundation Fellowship artist book series 2016 – April 17

 

From 10am-1pm – White Gloves Room, level 4. The Siganto Foundation Fellows presented a display that featured their research and creative works which included research papers, artist books, drawings, letterpresses and prints. The Fellows spoke with attendees about their work and research outcomes. Participating in the Fellows White Gloves event were Peter Anderson, Lyn Ashby, Julie Barratt, Victoria Cooper, Marion Crawford, Jan Davis, Clyde McGill and Doug Spowart.

At 1:30pm on the Knowledge Walk Stage on level 1 – Clyde McGill presented Looking for Place, a performance for his artist book.

At 2pm The lecture component of the event was opened by Chief Executive Officer and State Librarian, Sonia Cooper. This was followed by a presentation by guest, UK artist and designer, Guy Begbie who talked about his current interdisciplinary arts practice. Following on – Dr Victoria Cooper, the 2015 Siganto Foundation Fellow, talked about her research into the use of montage in the State Library of Queensland’s artists’ book collection.

From 3.30pm attendees enjoyed refreshments in the SLQ Boardroom on level 5.

 

HERE ARE SOME PHOTOS AND OTHER DETAILS OF THE EVENT:

 

Siganto Foundation Fellows in the White Gloves Room

Siganto Foundation Fellows in the White Gloves Room

 

Clyde McGill performing Looking for Place @ SLQ Sigantio Artists Book Series 2016 event

Clyde McGill performing Looking for Place @ SLQ Sigantio Artists Book Series 2016 event

 

CLYDE McGILL: Looking for Place, a performance for artist book (an extract)

Crossing the river under the Goodwill bridge, knee then neck deep in the warm water, not too salty, navigating around the mangrove roots, expecting to hear mud crabs clanking and whistling, curling my toes just in case, alloneword, who calls me fictivefriend, if only he knew, shows me another pressed flower (soggy) and a leaf. Then a pterodactyl feather he says was floating down from Mt Bartle Frere last night, I suggest it was the southern end of the Glass House Mountains. It looks like it’s from the ibisosaurus between GOMA and SLQ. We are dodging the rivercat (aow carrying our bag of sandwiches above his head), the tide is running. Finally making our way over to HMAS Diamantina to borrow her (alloneword thinks we’ll have to pay), in our bid to sail her along the Diamantina River (there is water). It’s an incredible resonance of names and place, isn’t it fictivefriend, he asks. Soon we’ll picnique (no replacements found, typeahead here) on the shores of the Inland Sea. We drip mud as we tell the man at the dock entrance about our project, it’s exciting, he raises his eyebrows, says what(?) looks away and closes the gate.

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SLQ VIDEO of the performance: http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/audio-video/webcasts/recent-webcasts/clyde-mcgills-performance

Clyde McGill performing his artists' book Looking for Place

Clyde McGill performing his artists’ book Looking for Place

Clyde McGill performing Looking for Place @ SLQ Sigantio Artists Book Series 2016 event

Clyde McGill presents a fragment of his presentation to Dr Marie Siganto.

 

 

Christene Drewe from the SLQ introduces the program for the day

Christene Drewe from the SLQ introduces the program for the day

 

Guy Begbie presenting @ Siganto Seminar Series 2016

Guy Begbie presenting @ Siganto Seminar Series 2016

 

THE GUY BEGBIE PRESENTATION

 

Guy Begbie is an interdisciplinary artist, bookbinder & university associate lecturer.

As an artist, he makes book works influenced by a core interest in parallels between bookbinding structures & architectural forms.

He works in a variety of media, that includes traditional bindery materials, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculptural casting and filmmaking.

His work uses non-linear narrative and sculptural forms to investigate further innovative structures for the book and the potential in its transition from a closed two dimension to an opened three dimensionality.

The notion of a contained space in the book is of particular interest, both conceptually and physically, with book works alluding to spatial qualities in architecture and the built environment.

Filmic and time based qualities are also examined in other book works, using painterly printmaking media to present visual distillations of memories of place and the the fleeting moment.

The relationship of the book juxtaposed with the solid non-paper based artifact is also of concern and is tested through placement and the filming of constructed books and cast objects that both share some common aspects in media and construction methodologies.

This dichotomy of the kinetic book structure and the static cast form, is re-scaled in projection and further informed by the sound of the book, captured through recording the making and placement processes, then configured to provide audio soundtrack supporting the moving visual image.

http://www.guybegbie.com/Pages/default.aspx

SLQ Video of Guy’s presentation: http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/audio-video/webcasts/recent-webcasts/guy-begbie

 

Dr Victoria Cooper presenting @ Siganto Seminar Series 2016

Dr Victoria Cooper presenting @ Siganto Seminar Series 2016

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DR VICTORIA COOPER’s PRESENTATION

A segment from Victoria’s presentation follows:

 

Montage Readings: Informed by History

 

There is a long tradition of artists and designers creatively combining images.

Photomontage or combination printing has its origins in late-nineteenth-century pictorial photography, most notably in the work of Henry Peach Robinson and Oscar Rejlander.

Then in the early twentieth century, Russian filmmakers, notably Sergei Eisenstein, pioneered the practice of montage in motion picture films to present animated visual concepts and to record the passing of time. Also in the first part of the 20th century, there was the work of the German and Russian visual artists including Hanna Höch, George Grosz, John Heartfield, El Lissitzky and Alexander Rodchenko used the “cut and paste” mediums of photocollage and photomontage to create political and social commentaries.

The surrealists such as Max Ernst, and Salvador Dalí and many other artists of this movement used the montage/collage to create visual contradictions referencing the uncanny connection between psychology of dreams and familiar experiences of the world.

Bauhaus teacher, pioneering designer and experimental artist László Moholy-Nagy became well known for his creative use of photomontage with text and image to construct innovative posters and page designs for his visual narratives. In a 1925 text, Painting Photography Film, Moholy-Nagy described this work as photoplastics.

 

My Project

Rather than see the concept of montage limited to that of a special case of film editing, he argues that the montage … is a principle to be found underlying artistic construction of all kinds

Eisenstein’s original concept of montage was that meaning in the cinema was not inherent in any filmed object but was carried by the collision of two signifying elements.

Geoffrey Nowell-Smith Eisenstein on Montage, in Towards a Theory of Montage, 2010 pp. xiii-xvi

From the research I was drawn to the montage as a way of thinking and making. In this Fellowship I am now engaged with the montage and its ‘reading”. In this project I intended to investigate the montage through the Reading the elements… their Edges, Borders and Intervals.. or their ‘collisions’ The act of cutting and splicing in the creation of the collage/montage assigns new meanings and readings to the individual fragments. Each element, fractured by tearing or careful cutting (whether physical or virtual) before the blending, overprinting, or collage construction phase, forms the basic structure, a mise-en-scène, or syntax, of the final visual composition and narrative work.

I am interested in the differences of reading that is created through of the visible edge As opposed to the Fused and the seamless edge of the elements in montage.

These edges, whether seamless or visible, always refer to the nature of its original content, as in the grafted fruit tree where the origins of the elements are still evident. The narrative then becomes embedded or montaged inside the reading of the image or the page.

 

More to follow in a subsequent post on this Blog. The SLQ will post a video of the presentation shortly

 

SLQ Video of the lecture: http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/audio-video/webcasts/recent-webcasts/victoria-cooper

 

We offer our thanks to the SLQ team: Christene Drewe, Sharon Nolan, Bec Kilner, and Janette Garrard and also to the Dr Marie Siganto and the Siganto Foundation for their support of this event.

 

THE OPENING RENATA BUZIAK’S ‘Medicinal Plant Cycles’ by Dr Victoria Cooper

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Image: Centella asiatica… anti-inflammatory… 2015, archival print on paper, 66.7 x 95cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Renata Buziak: Centella asiatica anti-inflammatory 2015, archival print on paper, 66.7 x 95cm.

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MEDICINAL PLANT CYCLES: RENATA BUZIAK

 

'Medicinal Plant Cycles' installation

Medicinal Plant Cycles installation

 

@ Redland Art Gallery: 24 APRIL – SUNDAY 5 JUNE 2016

Medicinal Plant Cycles by Renata Buziak is an exhibition of medical plant images was opened by Dr Victoria Cooper on April 22nd. Buziak’s work is based on the fusion of organic and photographic materials in a process of decomposition that Buziak names the ‘biochrome’. They are generated by arranging plant samples on photographic emulsions and allowing them to transform through the bacterial micro-organic activities that are part of cyclic decay and regeneration.

Through this exhibition Buziak hopes to reveal a beauty in decomposition and raise notions of transformative cycles. This focus on Minjerribah medicinal plants aims to promote the recognition, appreciation, and value of local medicinal plants in the context of Aboriginal knowledge and natural science.   (From the gallery and Renata Buziak’s website)

 

Victoria Cooper opening address

Dr Victoria Cooper opening address

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An extract from Victoria’s opening address:

 

Renata Buziak’s art presents a synergy with the natural environment rather than the considered reconfiguration of natural objects seen in the work of many contemporary artists that follow in the land art tradition of Andy Goldsworthy and Richard Long­. As such Buziak’s work and methodology invests in collaboration and empathy in all aspects of her research.

Through her Biochrome process Buziak visually explores the complexity–sometimes messy and chaotic–within the lifecycle of plants and the ecological systems that sustains them. Within the process, and evident in the final works, is the agency of borders, boundaries and edges. It is at the edges of the plants from the leaves and stems down to the cellular level that vital exchanges occur between life, death and decay. Buziak also works in the generative but slippery space that traverses the boundaries of art and science, culture and knowledge.

At first sight, these images are an aesthetic experience: of colour, shape, form and texture. But as I spend time to look into the microscopic worlds made visible within each image, I am drawn into other aspects of the work. I am engaged by the evolving story of her investigation with this process that is underpinned by a respect for the lived experience and knowledge of Aboriginal culture.

As I continue to linger–taking time for reverie–questions emerge along with a sense of wonder. These images are a visual thesis for the Deep Ecology of these medicinal plants and the natural environment that forms the unseen and unknown of our everyday existence.

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Renata and Victoia

Renata and Victoria

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