wotwedid

Victoria Cooper+Doug Spowart Blog

Archive for the ‘Wot happened on this day’ Category

WORLD CYANOTYPE DAY 2022: ANZ – Online Exhibition

leave a comment »

ENLIGHTEN Header.

EACH YEAR FOR THE LAST 4 YEARS WE HAVE COORDINATED AN EXHIBITION OF  ARTWORKS BY AUSTRALIAN CYANOTYPE PRINTMAKERS TO CELEBRATE INTERNATIONAL EVENTS LINKED TO WORLD CYANOTYPE DAY.

Unlike most years where the exhibition is in a physical gallery this year the exhibition is an online catalogue. Another aspect of World Cyanotype Day (WCD) events is the connection that works made should respond to a theme which this year was – ENLIGHTEN. This year WCD falls on Saturday September 24th.

Our preparations for the exhibition began back in May with a call for expressions of interest from members of the Facebook Group The Cyanotype in Australia and New Zealand – A group we founded in 2019 to facilitate the first WCD exhibition at the Monash Gallery of Art.

Respondents were presented with the concept of “presenting your cyanotype in a way that shows something about you – It could be positioned in your studio, home setting, in the garden or somewhere in your locality”.

Twenty-five cyanotype makers sent in their submissions. These artworks were collated and prepared for the design stage of the project by us. Here are their cyanotypes and a link to download the catalogue. ALSO at the end of the post is the story and links to the previous year”s catalogues.

.

Here the submissions:

“CLICK” on the thumbnail to enlarge the image and see the author’s name and title

 

WCD 2022-CAT COVER-v2-2000pxl Angled

THE ONLINE CATALOGUE IS AVAILABLE TO DOWNLOAD –

Here is the file: CYANOTYPE CATALOGUE 2022v3

 

 

Here is the backstory the 5 Cyanotype in Australia and New Zealand WORLD CYANOTYPE DAY exhibitions & catalogues

 

CinAust Catalogue 2018-coverDownload: WCD_CinA-Catalogue-2018

Event 1 – 2018

In September 2018 The Cyanotype in Australia Facebook group was founded and held its first collective exhibition and illustrated catalogue as part as the global event World Cyanotype Day (WCD). Entitled In Anna’s Garden the exhibition referenced Anna Atkins’ pioneering role in the development of the cyanotype.

The exhibition was held in the Atrium Space at Monash Gallery of Art, Wheeler’s Hill, Melbourne and was opened by Gael E Phillips.  Gallery staff members Stephanie Richter and Gillian Jones joined with Victoria Cooper and Doug Spowart to prepare and hang the diverse representation of Australian contemporary cyanotype work. The Gallery Director Anouska Phizacklea attended the event along with many of the exhibitors.

 

CinAust Catalogue 2019-coverDownload: WCD_CinA-catalogue-2019

Event 2 – 2019

A world-wide call out from the A. Smith Gallery in Texas, USA, invited artists to participate in an exhibition by sending a cyanotype made on a 30cm square of fabric – referred to as ‘Flags’. The work was a personal response to the WCD theme for that year, Land / Sea / Sky.

The Cyanotype in Australia (CinA) co-ordinators decided to organize a collaborative show of cyanotype flags connecting with the WCD. Coordinated at the Maud Street Photo Gallery in Brisbane, the exhibition was called Under the Southern Sun. Again, the coordinators were supported by Gail Neumann, David Symons and Keiko Goto in the unpacking and hanging the flags in the gallery. However this was only the first part of a long and exciting journey for these cyanotype prints.

After the show came down, the working party packed up the show and the Flags were sent off to Texas where they were shown with all the other works from across the world at the A. Smith Gallery. Subsequently the exhibition was also shown at PhotoNOLA in New Orleans.

 

CinAust Catalogue 2020-cover Download: ____WCD 2020 CATALOGUE-FINALv3

Event 3 – 2020

Due to the pandemic 2020 was a difficult year to show work in a physical gallery space so the CinA co-ordinators created an online presence and an illustrated catalogue referencing the WCD theme of Interconnected. After a call out to all members of our Facebook group, artists from across Australia and around the world responded by contributing to the collection of a creative work that showcased the diverse practice of the cyanotype in Australia and elsewhere.

 

CinAust Catalogue 2021-coverDownload: WCD 2021 Exhibition-SCREEN_Res-Sept27

Event 4 – 2021

Despite the challenges of Covid, 2021 saw the return of a physical exhibition. Gail Neumann curated the show at KEPK Gallery in Brisbane, supported by other members of the CinA team. The WCD theme this year was REJUVENATION. Local art identity and cyanotyper LeAnne Vincent opened the exhibition and an illustrated catalogue was made available to participants.

 

Event 5 – 2022

For many surviving Covid, floods and fire and rebuilding their arts practice has been challenging over the last 2-3 years, so the return to an online format seemed a good option. Also at this time, the organisers felt that it was important to recognize our friends and colleagues from across “the ditch” in New Zealand, so our group name was changed to The Cyanotype in Australia and New Zealand.

The call for expressions of interest was made in May and those who responded were asked to submit work on the WCD theme – ENLIGHTEN. They were also requested to consider making an in-situ representation of their cyanotype image in their studio space or where they live, to add a personal and physical dimension to the virtual online space. The 2022 catalogue includes the artists who responded to the in-situ request, and also those who only sent through a photograph of their cyanotype.

Once again, the catalogue presents a survey of the practice of cyanotype within our region. We wish to thank the contributors for making work available for this catalogue as well as providing commentaries about their work.

 

ENJOY and be ENLIGHTENED about the work by the members of the Cyanotype in Australia and New Zealand.

 .

 .

ABOUT THE CYANOTYPE IN AUSTRALIA + NEW ZEALAND

The Cyanotype in Australia + New Zealand Facebook group has actively supported a vibrant community of practice of not only local, but also international cyanotypers for 5 yearsFF.

The Facebook page is a closed group though we welcome ‘Requests to join’ from cyanotype practitioners of this region.

The Cyanotype in Australia+New Zealand Team are Doug Spowart, Gail Neumann, David Symons and Victoria Cooper.

.

 

Cooper-Spowart_1788-side

.B

 

.

.

.
 ©2022 Doug Spowart+Victoria Cooper
.
 
Creative Commons-by-nc-nd.eu.
.
Our photographs and words are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/au/..

MGA POSTCARDS EXHIBITION – Our images

leave a comment »

.

WE RECENTLY RESPONDED TO A ‘CALL OUT’ FROM THE MONASH GALLERY OF ART to make and send in a POSTCARD representing ‘Our back yard’.

It is an interesting Mail Art Project so we selected images and sent them in. Recently we are in Melbourne and managed to go out to MCA to see their exhibitions and the post card show in the Atrium Gallery.

.

If you are interested in participating – The details and link are at the end of this post.

 

 

VICTORIA’s CARD: Image from the book VISUAL FIELD NOTES

Victoria Cooper MGA POST CARD

Victoria Cooper MGA POSTCARD

.

ABOUT VICKY’S POST CARD IMAGE: DAY DREAMING

We arrived in Benalla during one of the long Covid 19 lockdowns of Victoria. We found ourselves under a state wide travel restriction of only 5kms from our home. So walking became my way of exploring my new locality.

On these walks, and later on longer journeys,
I was captivated by the remnants of natural environment at the edge of the suburban spaces, roadsides and bushland. Here in the North East the trees tower like epic monuments to a pre-colonial history …

 

DOUG’s CARD:

An image from the book WALKING URBAN GROUND

Doug Spowart's MGA POSTCARD SHOW

Doug Spowart’s MGA POSTCARD SHOW

.

ABOUT DOUG’S POST CARD IMAGE:

This photo is about walking in the place where I live. While my walks with Vicky are for exercise, they are also an exploration of the streets, homes and spaces of my suburb.

During these walks I witness the seasons, varied architectural forms, garden features and the idiosyncratic things that homeowners create in their suburban environments.

In this work, from the book “Walking Urban Ground”, I explore through visual play, the creation of a joyful representation of the place where I live.

year I wandered as a free-ranging spirit on a bright sunny day through my local botanic garden. Spontaneously I responded to the subjects that emerged into my line of sight…

 .

 .

A POSTCARD FROM GLEN O’MALLEY is also in the show…

.

Screen Shot 2022-08-29 at 9.45.43 am

.

 

HERE’S THE SUBMISSION DETAILS

MGA-BIG Backyard call out

 

Postcards from our big backyard
“CLICK” URL HERE

3 August 2022 to 2 October 2022

MGA Atrium Gallery
Tuesday – Sunday

Postcards from our big backyard | Submissions now open

Viva Gibb took this photograph of the landscape she grew up on during a trip back to the area in the 1980s. The work is on display as part of MGA’s exhibition Return to nature, which journeys through the Australian landscape in photographs from the 1870s to today.

To coincide with this exhibition, we want you to send us a postcard of your big backyard!

Wherever you are in Australia, we want to see your landscape. So take a photograph of your corner of this great continent, print it at postcard size, write your name on the back, along with the title, date and a short note if you wish, then affix a stamp and send it by mail addressed to:

Monash Gallery of Art
860 Ferntree Gully Road
WHEELERS HILL
VIC 3150

 

We will then display your postcard in a growing exhibition in MGA’s Atrium gallery from 3 August to 2 October.

 

.

.

.
 ©2022 Doug Spowart+Victoria Cooper
.
 
Creative Commons-by-nc-nd.eu.
.
Our photographs and words are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/au/..

EULOGY: GRAHAM BURSTOW – A personal view

with 6 comments

.

BURSTOW-Self Portrait for Viewer & the Viewed exhibition QCP 2006

Graham Burstow – Self Portrait – Viewer & the Viewed show at QCP 2006

 

Recently I have been working through my extensive archive, and Graham Burstow‘s name kept surfacing. I found a piece of correspondence from nearly 20 years ago when I was asked by the Australian Honours Secretariat to support a nomination for Graham for an Australia Day Honour. At the time I was the chair of the AIPP Education Sub-committee and had previously provided letters of support for photography related nominations.

.

Even though 20 years has elapsed since being written, the words still hold true. We should recognise that Graham continued and expanded his connection with the great love of his life – photography.

.

I am honoured to be able to present this commentary on our friend – Graham Burstow OAM

.


.

LETTER DATED: August 3, 2003

Australian Honours Secretariat,
Government House,
Canberra    ACT  2600

Subject: Graham Burstow

Dear Secretariat,

I have known Graham Burstow since the late 1960’s. He has been a significant inspiration due to his dedication to the art of image-making, but also his support of many structures that shape photography in this country. While I make mention of this man’s influence on my life, his works and work have touched and inspired thousands of Australian and international photographers for nearly 50 years.

Graham Burstow’s main sphere of interest is in the camera club movement. He has held numerous positions within the Australian Photographic Society including national President, Chairman of the Print Division, keynote speaker and mentor. Since 1959 he has held positions within the Toowoomba Photographic Society (one of the oldest such groups in Australia). Burstow has been Chairman of no fewer than 6 national and international exhibitions of salon photography.

In his hometown of Toowoomba he has each year coordinated several national art photography awards including the McGregor Prize for Photography at the University of Southern Queensland, and the Heritage Photographic Award at the Toowoomba Regional Art Gallery since 1977. In my opinion Graham Burstow has a hand in, and a hand to offer, for anything photographic from presenting lectures or judging awards for students at the Southern Queensland Institute of TAFE where I work, or assisting community groups including senior citizens groups and Lifeline.

Burstow’s work appears regularly in magazines and publications including his self-published book “Touch Me”.  In 1984 I curated a substantial survey of his work at Imagery Gallery in Brisbane. His work has been shown in salon exhibitions world-wide and in major institutions like the Queensland Art Gallery.

Graham Burstow has received significant honours for his photographic work and his service to photography including the following: Associateship and EFIAP(service) of the International Federation of Photographic Art, Associateship of the Royal Photographic Society, Associateship of the Photographic Society of America and a Fellow and Honorary Fellow of the Australian Photographic Society.

In a review of his book “Touch Me” I commented that:

Burstow’s work is about sharing his vision with the world.  It represents a lifetime of photographic exploration of the art.  Burstow’s work is not just about camera club pictorialism but also aspects of the human condition and the humour of everyday situations.  This book is not intended as a catalogue for purchase, it is rather a communique, the photographer reaching out with the world in his photographs inviting the viewer to touch the experience portrayed.

Diversity of style and subject is apparent in Burstow’s journey in photography.  It seems as if he had walked alongside Max Dupain at the beach, been with Wolfgang Sievers at the building site, shared an impromptu moment with Henri Cartier-Bresson, a portrait session with Arnold Newman, some personal introspective moments with Nan Goldin, and an adventure with Frank Hurley.

Australian photography would be greatly diminished if it were not for the contribution of this generous and modest man – I have great pleasure in supporting his nomination for the Order of Australia.

Yours faithfully,

Doug Spowart  M.Photog, FAIPP, Hon.FAIPP   Chair of the AIPP Education Sub-committee

 


 

A SELECTED COLLAGE OF IMAGES FROM GRAHAM’S LIFE

Click on the image to enlarge the view and see the full caption

 

SOME WORDS FROM GRAHAM …

Australian Cultural Library presentation media Cobb & Co Toowoomba 2021 PHOTO Doug Spowart

ACL presentation media at Cobb & Co Museum Toowoomba 2021 PHOTO Doug Spowart

.
 

For an insight into how he felt about his life in photography, an event in 2021 at the Cobb & Co Museum recorded by the Chronicle Newspaper (paywall) might provide an answer. Graham was being awarded a Life Membership of the Australian Cultural Library (ACL) by the director Steve Towson. In a video interview he was to comment that he had been photographing for 73 years. He also added:

When you look at the things you can do to keep your mind occupied and increase the length of your life, photography is nearly always near the top of the list.

It keeps your mind busy and even when you are not photographing you are probably thinking about something you want to photograph.

I think it’s worked in my case … I enjoy it, met a lot of wonderful people, it’s been great to get to go to a lot of interesting places… *

.

ONE FINAL STORY FROM GRAHAM …

In my collection I have a Graham Burstow photograph entitled No 2 The Day Ahead. For me, at this time it is a poignant image …

.

NO 2 THE DAY AHEAD by Burstow

 

 

.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT GRAHAM BURSTOW …

http://www.grahamburstow.com.au/

 

*Tribute for Toowoomba photographer icon Graham Burstow Stephen Burstow John Elliott | The Chronicle  (Paywall story)

Thanks to Bev Lacey for the ACL quote and photograph and Zigi for the gift of the Noosa 10×8 photograph

.

.

.

.

 

2022 WORLDWIDE PINHOLE DAY – Our images

leave a comment »

.

ON THE LAST SUNDAY IN APRIL pinhole photographers across the world gather together as individuals or groups to celebrate pinhole photography in all its forms.

This year for the first time in many years we find ourselves in a place that we call home. On this warm sunny April morning we connected with fellow Benalla artist, Maggie Hollins, and found joy in pinhole play on Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day. 

We met in the Benalla Botanic Gardens renown for its rose garden, cricket field, the lake and the Benalla Art Gallery. The Gardens and surrounds are a popular place for locals to picnic, exercise, canoe or just hang out.

 

This is the 16th year we have supported the WPPD project!

SEE LINKS to our other submissions at the end of this Post.

 

.

WHAT IS WORLDWIDE PINHOLE PHOTOGRAPHY DAY ALL ABOUT?

 

From the Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day website introduction:

All the photographs in this extraordinary collection share two common characteristics: (1) they are lensless photographs (2) they were all made on April 24, 2022.

They also share an additional and less formal characteristic: the sincere enthusiasm of their creators who, by participating in this collective event, shared individual visions and techniques. Hence the amazing diversity of subjects, cameras, techniques and photographic materials combined in this exhibit!

The process is that photographs are made on April 24 > they are processed / optimised by the photographer > uploaded and captioned on the WPPD website. The 2022 Gallery of images can be searched to see what photographers from around the world did on that day…

 

.

VICTORIA’s PINHOLE IMAGE: DAY DREAMING

.

.

ABOUT VICKY’S PINHOLE IMAGE: DAY DREAMING

.

A beautiful Autumn day beside the Benalla Art Gallery and lake.

 

 

OTHER IMAGES BY VICKY:

 

 

 

VICKY’s DIGI-PINHOLE CAMERA

Vicky's Pinhole Olympus Pen

Vicky’s Pinhole Olympus Pen

Camera Olympus Pen: 1/90 @2500 ISO the pinhole is made with a camera body cap and a handmade pinhole in pie tin foil.

.

 

DOUG’s PINHOLE IMAGE: WALKING THE DOGS

ABOUT DOUG’S PINHOLE IMAGE:

.

This year I wandered as a free-ranging spirit on a bright sunny day through my local botanic garden. Spontaneously I responded to the subjects that emerged into my line of sight…

 .

SOME OF DOUG’s OTHER IMAGES

.

 

DOUG’s DIGI-PINHOLE CAMERA

.

Doug-Pinhole+CAMERA-1200

My pinhole was a readymade found in our pinhole workshop toolbox – capture device a digital Canon 6D operated around ISO 6000 with a S/S of 60th part of a second. 

 

 

Visit the WWPD Site for details of other submissions:  http://pinholeday.org/

 

.

VIEW 16 YEARS OF PAST WPPD iMAGES:

2021 Doug+Vicky https://wordpress.com/post/wotwedid.com/12227

2020 Doug+Vicky https://wotwedid.com/2020/05/13/2020-worldwide-pinhole-day-26-april-our-images/

2019 Doug+Vicky https://wotwedid.com/2019/04/29/2019-worldwide-pinhole-day-28-april-our-images/

2018 Doug+Vicky https://wotwedid.com/2018/04/29/2018-worldwide-pinhole-day-29-april-our-images/

2016 Doug: http://www.pinholeday.org/index.php?id=1235

2016 Vicky: http://www.pinholeday.org/index.php?id=1540

2015  https://wotwedid.com/2015/05/04/april-26-worldwide-pinhole-day-our-contributions-for-2015/

2014  Vicky’s http://pinholeday.org/gallery/2014/index.php?id=1810&City=Toowoomba

2014  Doug’s http://pinholeday.org/gallery/2014/index.php?id=1811&City=Toowoomba

2013   https://wotwedid.com/2013/04/29/world-pinhole-photography-day-our-contribution/

2012   http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2012/index.php?id=1937&searchStr=spowart

2011    http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2011/index.php?id=924

HERE IS THE LINK to the 2011 pinhole video   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yk4vnbzTqOU

2010   http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2010/index.php?id=2464&Country=Australia&searchStr=spowart

2006  http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2006/index.php?id=1636&Country=Australia&searchStr=cooper

2004 Vicky  http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2004/index.php?id=1553&Country=Australia&searchStr=cooper

2004 Doug  http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2004/index.php?id=1552&Country=Australia&searchStr=spowart

2003  http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2003/index.php?id=615&Country=Australia&searchStr=spowart

2002  http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2002/index.php?id=826&Country=Australia&searchStr=spowart

.

.

.
 ©2022 Doug Spowart+Victoria Cooper
.
 
Creative Commons-by-nc-nd.eu.
.
Our photographs and words are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/au/..

2021 WORLDWIDE PINHOLE DAY – Our images

leave a comment »

WWPD 2021 LOGO

WWPD 2021 LOGO

.

Around the [w]hole world on Sunday April 25, 20201pinholers were out having fun – Making their images for the 2021 Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day.

This year – still in Toowoomba we’ve been working on projects and supporting family. Once again, far away from the darkroom, we’ve fitted a piece of aluminium with a light admitting pin-prick to the body cap of our Olympus Pen camera and braved the parkland at the end of our street. Recently we uploaded our images with a detailed caption to the WPPD website to add to the contributions from Australian pinholers and many more from around the world.

This is the 17th year we have supported the WPPD project!

SEE LINKS to our other submissions at the end of this Post.

 

WHAT IS WORLDWIDE PINHOLE PHOTOGRAPHY DAY ALL ABOUT?

From the Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day website introduction

All the photographs in this extraordinary collection share two common characteristics: (1) they are lensless photographs (2) they were all made on April 25, 2021.

They also share an additional and less formal characteristic: the sincere enthusiasm of their creators who, by participating in this collective event, shared individual visions and techniques. Hence the amazing diversity of subjects, cameras, techniques and photographic materials combined in this exhibit!

The process is that photographs are made on April 25 > they are processed / optimised by the photographer > uploaded and captioned on the WPPD website. The 2021 Gallery of images can be searched to see what photographers from around the world did on that day…

 

Here’s the website page of the Australian pinhole photographer’s works:

WPPD 2021 Australian submissions @ May 11, 2021

WPPD 2021 Australian submissions @ May 11, 2021

.

VICTORIA’s PINHOLE IMAGE: AFTERNOON WALK

Victoria Cooper's evening walk pinhole photo

Victoria Cooper’s Evening walk pinhole photo

 

ABOUT VICKY’S PINHOLE IMAGE:

 

We pass by these trees everyday… I decided to take pinhole photos of our walk as I enjoy the way they transform these everyday places into a kind of poem, not distinct nor descriptive just evocative.

 

 

DOUG’s PINHOLE IMAGE: TREE HOUSE

Tree House a pinhole image by Doug Spowart

Tree House a pinhole image by Doug Spowart

 

ABOUT DOUG’S PINHOLE IMAGE:

 

I chose the late afternoon to go out and make images as the low light angle and the deep shadows add drama and mystery to pinholes made at this time.

Over recent years I have continued to choose a digital camera and aluminium pie dish with a pin prick in it. Wet darkrooms and film, although it suited the zone plates of landscape that I made are beyond my current means – perhaps next year…

 .

OUR Digi-PINHOLE CAMERA

The Cooper+Spowart digi OLYMPUS PEN with pinhole ...

The Cooper+Spowart digi OLYMPUS PEN with pinhole …

This is a converted digital Olympus Pen, shared with my partner Doug Spowart. The pinhole is a pin pierced hole in aluminium which is inserted into a hole drilled into a body cap. It is a hand held exposure of 1/25th second at ISO 2000.

 

 

Visit the WWPD Site for details of other submissions:  http://pinholeday.org/

.

Our Past WPPD images:

2020 Doug+Vicky https://wotwedid.com/2020/05/13/2020-worldwide-pinhole-day-26-april-our-images/

2019 Doug+Vicky https://wotwedid.com/2019/04/29/2019-worldwide-pinhole-day-28-april-our-images/

2018 Doug+Vicky https://wotwedid.com/2018/04/29/2018-worldwide-pinhole-day-29-april-our-images/

2016 Doug: http://www.pinholeday.org/index.php?id=1235

2016 Vicky: http://www.pinholeday.org/index.php?id=1540

2015  https://wotwedid.com/2015/05/04/april-26-worldwide-pinhole-day-our-contributions-for-2015/

2014  Vicky’s http://pinholeday.org/gallery/2014/index.php?id=1810&City=Toowoomba

2014  Doug’s http://pinholeday.org/gallery/2014/index.php?id=1811&City=Toowoomba

2013   https://wotwedid.com/2013/04/29/world-pinhole-photography-day-our-contribution/

2012   http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2012/index.php?id=1937&searchStr=spowart

2011    http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2011/index.php?id=924

HERE IS THE LINK to the 2011 pinhole video   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yk4vnbzTqOU

2010   http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2010/index.php?id=2464&Country=Australia&searchStr=spowart

2006  http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2006/index.php?id=1636&Country=Australia&searchStr=cooper

2004 Vicky  http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2004/index.php?id=1553&Country=Australia&searchStr=cooper

2004 Doug  http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2004/index.php?id=1552&Country=Australia&searchStr=spowart

2003  http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2003/index.php?id=615&Country=Australia&searchStr=spowart

2002  http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2002/index.php?id=826&Country=Australia&searchStr=spowart

.

.

.
 ©2021 Doug Spowart+Victoria Cooper
.
 
Creative Commons-by-nc-nd.eu.
.
Our photographs and words are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/au/..

JADA 2020: DRAWING on the PHYSICAL & VIRTUAL Exhibition Space

leave a comment »

Standing in the gallery before David FAIRBURN’s Drawn together-Double portraits V.H & J.E.L NO5

.

The Pandemic and its significant social disruption has reduced the ability for visitors to enter the physical gallery. However the gallery has reached out through Internet mediated platforms to present online formatted exhibitions to not only to those in lockdown just down the street but also to those geographically distanced from the gallery.

This take-up of online exhibitions has been significant that now it seems that every gallery, as well as entrepreneurial artist, have a virtual gallery. Specialist online providers include Matterport, Ortelia Curator and Exhibbit.

.

Some of these online programs can not only give the gallery a record of virtual attendances and where those visitors came from through their ‘hits’ stats, they may even be able to track the way visitors navigate through the online exhibition space. Bravo to the galleries who have stepped up to provide art interested people a 21st century solution to the COVID-19 challenge to provide a connection with commercial or institutional gallery spaces.

.


.

Grafton Regional Gallery

.

At the end of November 2020 after the relaxation of the Pandemic travel restrictions on the Queensland/New South Wales border we visited the Grafton Regional Gallery and the showing of the 2020 Biennial Jacaranda Acquisitive Drawing Award (JADA).

Earlier in lockdown we visited the 2020 JADA quite a few times via their excellent online gallery. On these virtual visits we were presented with an online experience of being ‘in’ the space with enhancements that enabled us to zoom into full size images of the work and through a ‘click’ button, the ability to read the title of the work, artist’s name and other artwork details. While we were online visiting it was interesting to consider that others from all over the country, or even the world, could be simultaneously in the same virtual gallery space.

.

The Matterport virtual gallery – JADA 2020

 


.

SOME OF THE 2020 JADA FACTS

The JADA exhibition presents a snapshot of the contemporary practice of the drawing artform. The 2020 awards presented 56 works from a record total entry of 659. Pre-selection was carried out by Peter Wood (CEO, Arts Northern Rivers), Brett Adlington (Director, Lismore Regional Gallery, Michael Zavros (artist and 2002 JADA winner), and Heather Brown (President, Friends of Grafton Gallery). The judge of the final Award was Peter McKay, curatorial manager Australian Art at the Queensland Art Gallery — Gallery of Modern Art. A catalogue essay was written by Andrew Frost.

Teo TRELOAR – This is impermanence

.

Teo Treloar’s work titled This is Impermanence (2019) was announced as the winner and Sarah Tomasetti’s work titled Kailash North Face IV (2019) and, Noel McKenna’s work titled Hamlet (2020) were recommended for purchase for the JADA Collection.

.


.

DRAWING ON THE EXPERIENCE OF THE ARTWORKS

The JADA exhibition reveals a myriad of techniques, media and surfaces. The view of the artwork in the physical space of the gallery is a sensory experience that provides an opportunity to encounter the actual art object and the potential for much closer viewing that can reveal so much more about the work.

For that reason my physical experience in viewing the actual work gave me a deeper experience of the media used and the way it contributed to the artist’s communiqué. Now this may sound as if I’m proposing that the physical beats the virtual but that is not my point. The online space is critical to the broad distribution of the artworks in any exhibition. In many ways the viewing of a pixel presented view of an artwork is not dissimilar to how we experience art in the printed form in a magazine or book.

The online exhibition can convey extended information about the art and the exhibition through downloadable catalogues that cover artist’s statements, the judge’s comments and an essay. What I’m highlighting is that the online exhibition plays an important role in connecting viewers with art that is inaccessible for whatever reason. Seeing the physical object in the gallery is an elevated experience. So it is important to note that JADA is a travelling exhibition and that the ability to physically view the works will be afforded thousands of visitors during its 2 year showing.

It is important to applaud the Grafton Regional Gallery for their initiative in organising, hosting the physical show, coordinating the online exhibition and the touring component. For without JADA’s significant biennial review of the discipline in Australia the drawing community of practice could be fragmented and isolated.

My discussions in this Blog post has been in response to seeing the drawing artworks in the gallery space and connect personally with the detail of the mark and its surface. So to share the richness of the close-up physical experience I approached the Gallery to provide me with access to the catalogue and the information it contains. I have now linked this information with close-up images of selected works from photographs* made while I viewed the exhibition. Through this Blog post I’m attempting to extend the virtual viewer’s experience – it may represent a future enhancement to the online gallery.

Enjoy …

 

Doug Spowart

*Note some of the photographs contain minor reflections of lighting and other frames from the gallery space.

.


.

View our Blog posts on previous JADA 2018 and JADA 2014

.

Download a copy of the JADA 2020 Catalogue 2020 JADA Catalogue

2020 JADA Catalogue Cover

 

VIEWING THE JADA 2020 IN DETAIL

“CLICK” Image to enlarge

 

Jennifer Keeler-MilneBurnt, blackened, charred, scorched burnt offerings 2020 7 domes: charcoal, paper, glass, timber, foliage, paint Courtesy of the Artist and Australian Galleries, Sydney and Melbourne

MEDIUM: 7 domes: charcoal, paper, glass, timber, foliage, paint

MEDIUM: ink and pencil on paper

MEDIUM: graphite on rag paper

MEDIUM: charcoal and pastel on mat board

MEDIUM: charcoal and pastel on paper

MEDIUM: charcoal and ink

MEDIUM: ink, acrylic, oil stick, pastel and hand stitching with string on paper

MEDIUM: ink, pastel and stitching

MEDIUM: ink, pigment, acrylic binder on handmade paper

MEDIUM: ink on paper

 

 

MEDIUM: ink, gouache and pastel primer on cast carbon fibre

MEDIUM: felt tip pen with paper folds

 

MEDIUM: charcoal on Snowden catridge

MEDIUM: charcoal and white chalk on toned paper

MEDIUM: graphite on paper

MEDIUM: charcoal and conte on fabriano

MEDIUM: hand painted ceramic tiles

MEDIUM: graphite and White Conte Crayon on Grey Canson Paper

MEDIUM: graphite and White Conte Crayon on Grey Canson Paper

MEDIUM: graphite on hand built and etched porcelain

MEDIUM: ink and gouache on paper

MEDIUM: digital video: chalk, charcoal and acrylic animation on paper, 5:58 minutes (Detail of digital presentation)

 

 

VISIT THE ONLINE GALLERY  HERE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

.

.

Thank you to Niomi Sands, Director of the Grafton Regional Gallery and the Gallery team for their support in preparing this Blog post.

 

In accessing this post please respect the copyrights in the works displayed.

.

.

.

.

 

ARTISTS FACING STUDIO CLOSURE: QCA vs Griffith University

with 2 comments

Over the last month there have been reports coming out of the Queensland College of Art about proposed changes being instigated by the hosting institution Griffith University. The University’s intentions are outlined in the University’s ‘Proposal for Workplace Change Roadmap to Sustainability *’.

*If link is broken Download a copy of the Proposal for Workplace Change Roadmap to Sustainability ‘  GU-QCA-Proposal-for-Workplace-Change-Roadmap-to-Sustainability_students

.

Outcry from a cross-section of the Arts community has been forthcoming. This has included Arts academics, current and past students, staff and colleagues, Arts organisations like Occuli, NAVA, Brisbane Visual Arts Advocacy Group, Artisan and The Print Council of Australia, Arts Agencies and other supporting groups.

 

Save our Studios Poster by Isobelle Dwyer

Save our Studios Poster by Isobelle Dwyer

 

.

.AS ALUMNI WE WANT TO SUPPORT THE QCA

So we composed the following letter to the Griffith University’s Vice Chancellor:

 

Dear Griffith University Vice Chancellor Professor Carolyn Evans,

By now you will have received a significant number of responses relating to the proposed changes to the Queensland College of Art.

I have read many of the responses to these changes posted online and I concur with the concerns raised by many of the respondents. The Queensland College of Art has history, a solid reputation for the quality of its graduates and the possibility to contribute significantly to the ongoing record of the life of human and non-human habitation on this planet.

Imagine for a moment if you can your world without the framed artwork on the wall – what it’s like to witness the vibe of the well attended gallery, the encounter of a sculpture in a public space, and the wonder of the fleeting image on Instagram. All of these are created by artists – the very people who will be affected by the changes you are intending to implement.

I understand the contemporary funding pressures created by the Pandemic and government indifference to the need to financially support academic study and research into the broader aspects of human existence.

However there is a necessity to be careful that rapid submission to comply, with what may be short-term influences, will have implications. Not just within the fine arts discipline but also, as the artist tells the stories of their times, fewer qualified practitioners will culminate in a gap in the creative record of human existence.

I urge Griffith University to reconsider what has been proposed and find a space to allow art and artists to be nurtured within the Griffith University academic programs.

I also wish you to consider that while many other universities may be considering a similar course of action in cutting Fine arts programs Griffith University has an opportunity to stand firm and continue the Queensland College of Art and realise the benefits identified in the vision and dreams that the supporters of the SAVE our STUDIOS have.

The studio is the crucible that provides the catalyst and engine room for the creative thought…

Sincerely,

Dr Doug Spowart M.Photog, FAIPP, HonFAIPP         Dr Victoria Cooper M.Photog, HonFAIPP

Graduate: College of Art Brisbane 1972                                                  Graduate: Queensland College of Art Brisbane 1993

 

 

A RESPONSE TO THE EMAIL WAS RECEIVED LATER IN THE DAY …

.

 

.

STUDENT PROTESTS AND MEDIA REPORTS HAVE BEEN SUCCESSFUL IN GENERATING COMMUNITY AWARENESS

.

Photos courtesy of Cheryl Bronson

Photos courtesy of Cheryl Bronson

.

An ABC TV REPORT HERE

AND

An ABC RADIO INTERVIEW HERE

(interview begins at around 1:42:45 and runs for 15 mins)

.

A PETITION

At the time of posting the SAVE OUR STUDIOS Petition had received 10.6K signatures

– You can add your support by signing the petition here: http://chng.it/Zv22YbfP6y

.

FB Page

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE QCA SOS PROTEST VISIT:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/teamqcasos

 

Save our Studios QCA by Summer Hiskens-Ravest

 

.

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY and the School of Art and Design

It’s interesting to note that at this time the Australian National University is doing the same for their Art programs with their demand being “…the long-standing structural deficit of the School cannot continue and must be addressed. The School must position itself tobe able to deliver its programs and research with continued excellence but in a financially viable and sustainable manner.”

READ MORE HERE: https://www.anu.edu.au/files/guidance/Managing%20Change%20Proposal_CASS_Tranche%202_November%202020_.pdf?

If link is broken Download a copy HERE ANU-Managing Change Proposal_CASS_Tranche 2_November 2020_

.

.

.

.

QUEENSTOWN’s UNCONFORMITY 2018 – From the Archive

leave a comment »

Driving to Queenstown for the 2018 UNCONFORMITY Art Festival

A diaristic record of the journey to Tasmania’s west coast two years ago – October 2018

NOTE: The 2020 UNCONFORMITY was cancelled due to the pandemic.
A link to their COVOD-19 response can be seen HERE
vvv

Road to Queenstown

 

The road convulses, twists and turns as if the wilderness has challenged its taming by the road builders and engineers. Just when the wild begins to overcome your imagination a mountain ridge is crested and opening up before you is a place made by man and commerce showing their destruction of the landscape to make a place, a wild place – home.

The town of Queenstown is nestled in a valley floor through which flows a stream, a road and a railway line. The mining ceased after 100 years of operation and the town now seems devoid of what must have been the hustle and bustle of its glory days. Left orphaned by those who have moved on are commercial buildings intended for a permanence that is now redundant. Other buildings are kept cobbled together by make-do maintenance. The occasional sign in the empty shop window proclaiming “FOR RENT”. Houses of corrugated iron and rough stone construction and the occasional 1940s or 50s flat roofed ‘modern style’ straddle the ridges. They sometimes hang precariously from the narrow winding roads that move from the central business area outwards and upwards like a schematic of the human circulatory system.

 

 

In this unlikely place there exists a community of artists ranging from those for whom it is a hobby for personal life enrichment to those, many of whom are of national stature in their disciplines. Bi-yearly a special event in Queenstown celebrates its art community as well as those from around that country and the world who consider the locale as a touchstone and inspiration for their art.

Called ‘The Unconformity’ the event takes its name from an unusual rock formation found locally that was the natural catalyst for the mineral riches that were found there. ‘The Unconformity’ takes place over 3 days and attracts a worldwide audience.

Our unique proposition is to be a cultural conduit into western Tasmania—a place hard to get to and harder to engage—by mining a new cultural commodity with the spirit of independence, boldness, risk and adventure that is melded to our region’s DNA.

Mission statement from The Unconformity website

.

 

 

We sat in a café munching on a magnificent homemade pie and at a table nearby the (then) former senator for Tasmania Jacqui Lambie also having lunch. I discovered a long lost cousin, the artist Beverley Loverock in a shop that is her studio at the top end of town. And just walking down a street between visiting art galleries and events we encountered Marc Pricop, a photodocumentary photographer who we knew from Brisbane when he was a student at the Queensland College of Art.

 

Just off the main street we caught up with nationally recognised printmaker Raymond Arnold who first came to the region in the 1970s as part of the Franklin Gordon Blockade protest. His connection with the place at that time left an indelible mark on him and for the last 18 years has set up his studio there with his wife Helena Demczuk. Called LARQ his modern studio and gallery featured an expansive artwork created in response to his years in Tasmania. It featured 100 hard ground line etchings, some multi-plates, which were presented in the gallery as 100 individually framed works as well as the assembled plates in a mosaic format that stretched the length of the studio’s main wall.

 

 

We were only able to stay for the better part of two days as local accommodation is booked out well in advance and we travelled from Tarraleah to Strahan and back to Tarraleah late Sunday afternoon. There was just not enough time to take in the range of art, performance, videos and presentations on offer many of which were booked out … But then there’s the next event in two years – we’ll be back.

HERE IS A COLLAGE OF THINGS WITNESSED DURING OUR VISIT…

 

NOTE: Due to copyright restrictions Youtube has muted most of the audio in this video – Imagine AC/DC music LOUD…!

.

 

 

SOME LINKS…

 

https://www.theunconformity.com.au/

 

https://theconversation.com/the-unconformity-festival-embraces-the-power-and-peculiarity-of-tasmanias-wild-west-106147

 

https://unco-assets.s3.amazonaws.com/static/images/background-looped.4d0f74bf780d.mp4

 

 

PROGRAM

https://www.theunconformity.com.au/program/

 

EVENTS

https://www.theunconformity.com.au/events/

 

A WIKI

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Unconformity

 

Written by Cooper+Spowart

October 25, 2020 at 9:28 am

CYANOTYPE IN AUSTRALIA Celebrates World Cyanotype Day 2020

with 2 comments

CYANOTYPE 2020 MOSAIC

 

The world is in a pandemic turmoil but beneath the stress, pain and fear of what some call the ‘new normal’ artists have continued making their art. During this time online connectivity has provided the space to coalesce communities of practice across the world where ideas and creative products can be shared, discussed, recognised and critiqued.

Cyanotypers worldwide celebrated 2020 WORLD CYANOTYPE DAY on the 26th of September by making cyanotypes, presenting work in exhibitions and online through their social media platforms. In the USA there are dedicated groups that have continued to support the medium: Db Dennis Waltrip, Judy & Amy and the World Cyanotype Day web and Facebook group; Malin Fabbri‘s  Alternativephotography.com; and Amanda Smith’s Gallery in Texas. These people have created the glue that brings together cyanotypers from around the world.

Two years ago The Cyanotype in Australia Facebook Group was formed to bring together contemporary cyanotype work for presentation in major survey shows to celebrate Australian practioners from across the country on World Cyanotype Day. The first show in 2018, ‘In Anna’s Garden’ was presented at the prestigious Monash Gallery of Art, Melbourne. Last year ‘Under the Southern Sun’ was shown at The Maud Street Photo Gallery – The Queensland Centre for Photography. This exhibition then toured to two venues in the USA: the A. Smith Gallery, Texas, and PhotoNOLA, New Orleans for the international World Cyanotype Day exhibition.

The Cyanotype in Australia Facebook group has actively supported a vibrant community of practice of not only local, but also international cyanotypers. This year, we decided to curate the World Cyanotype Day event online through the Facebook Group page as this space enabled many artists from across Australia and internationally to contribute during these challenging times. We asked our Facebook Group members to select a cyanotype that may have been their first print, an image of a current process investigation or a work that tells a story. Forty-three Australian and a few international Friends responded and posted their work on the page.

This catalogue has now been collated to show the breadth and creative work of these artists. We are again excited to present the amazing work of Australians including our international friends on The Cyanotype in Australia for World Cyanotype Day 2020.

The Cyanotype in Australia Facebook page is a closed group though we welcome ‘Requests to join’ from cyanotype practitioners.

 

Doug Spowart,

with Gail Neumann, David Symons and Victoria Cooper are The Cyanotype in Australia Team

 

.

A GALLERY OF WORKS CAN BE SEEN HERE

More information about these works can be found in the catalogue

Download the catalogue via this link  ____WCD 2020 CATALOGUE-FINALv4

 

.

.

 

Over the last two years the CYANOTYPE IN AUSTRALIA Facebook group has coordinated major events to coincide with this celebration.

the ‘In Anna’s Garden’ catalogue

In 2018 an exhibition entitled “IN ANNA’s GARDEN” was curated Stephanie Richter, Gillian Jones, Victoria Cooper and Doug Spowart for showing at the Monash Gallery of Art.

A blog post for this exhibition can be viewed HERE

A download of the “In Anna’s Garden” catalogue can be accessed HERE

.

.

INVITE: Under the Southern Sun

2019 saw the assembly of a group of Australian cyanotyper’s works to be sent to the A. Smaith Gallery and Photo  in New Orleans for the WCD International exhibition. The cyanotypes were firstly shown in the exhibition “UNDER THE SOUTHERN SUN” at The Maud Street Photo Gallery – The Queensland Centre for Photography.

A blog post for this exhibition can be viewed HERE

A download of “Under the Southern Sun” catalogue can be accessed HERE

.

.

.

.

.

.

Father’s Day: A remembrance in an art project

leave a comment »

Father’s Day 2020 – Thinking of our Dads

 

In 2010 artist, and then gallerist, Julie Barratt put out a call for artworks that asked artists to respond about their Fathers and their passing.

The request from Julie Barratt is as follows:

This project was borne out of the recent sudden death of my father, a handkerchief, some emotive words written by a sibling on his death and the traumatic aftermath of a death processed according to particular societal and cultural mores. Interested artists and Individuals are invited to create an artwork on a handkerchief (any handkerchief not necessarily a man’s) based around death/grief/bereavement.

We reflected on our connection with our Fathers and created artworks using the cyanotype process.

 

Doug’s Hankie

The WHITE KNIGHT – for Merv by Doug Spowart

 

MERV: The White Knight

 My father was an electrician for around sixty years. He always wore King Gee white overalls—even when we went on holidays.

Ever ready to help someone in need he would dash off at a moment’s notice—even when the family organised an outing on the weekend we would always fit in another job along the way.

Over the years he helped many an electrically troubled soul so we, his family, dubbed him the nickname – “The white knight”.

 

 

Victoria’s Hankie

Dad’ll do it – for Reg by Victoria Cooper

 

Dad’ll do it

I remember that he always tied knots in his hankie to keep it in place on his head and to soak up the sweat when he was working on things around the home. He had lived in this home (in the photo) for most of his life except for the time he was in Papua New Guinea for WW2 and shorter periods of time in other places. Over the years he adapted and renovated this home to suit the changing needs of the family.

 

.

.

Barratt Gallery Invite

.

The exhibition was shown at Barratt Gallery at Alstonville and Napier Gallery Melbourne

.

 

A post about the exhibition can be found HERE

.

.

.

.

.

.

%d bloggers like this: