Victoria Cooper+Doug Spowart Blog

IAN POOLE photographer: eulogy

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Poole by Poole 2006


IAN POOLE photographer: eulogy by Doug Spowart


I was over in Wellington New Zealand attending the Photobook NZ conference when our mutual friend Simon Woolf came to tell me that Ian had passed away. Vicky and I had visited Ian and Louise at the Mater Hospital a couple of weeks ago and while Ian was in a difficult place we shared some past experiences. We spoke excitedly about how Ian came out of hospital recently to open ‘Floating’ at Woolloongabba Art Gallery. It was an important occasion as the exhibition featured work by his long-term friends Glen O’Malley and Yoshiteru Asai as well as artworks by Yayu, Ken Yamane’s grand-daughter.


Ian Poole, Glen, Ruby, Asai, Joe and Doug at the opening of Floating


Ian Poole and I shared quite a chunk of history – On hearing the news whatever I was to do that day in Wellington, and my flight home to Brisbane, my thoughts were with Ian, Louise, Nicola and Denise. What follows is a fragment of our connections and things that I remember about the guy…


Pinhole portrait of Ian Poole 1993 by Doug Spowart


My earliest memory of Ian was in the mid 1970s when I met him as an employee of Kodak in Brisbane. Ian had formed a commercial photography partnership with Greg Minns and I served him in my early sales position behind a wholesale warehouse counter in the Fortitude Valley head office. Over time I was to learn of Ian’s pre-commercial work as a part-time wedding photographer for some of Brisbane’s significant studios.

Ian Poole went out on his own in 1976 with the business name ‘Ian Poole does Photography’. He shared a studio in an old church in Warren Street, Fortitude Valley with commercial photographer and AIPP devotee and then Federal President David McCarthy. From there good wine, cigars and Fiats were funded through a diverse range of commercial commissions.

Ian and Denise were married and soon after Nicola was born. A long-term relationship with documentary/art photographer Glen O’Malley strengthened along with his interest in photography beyond the ‘job’ – for him photography was more than just what you did to earn a living.


Ian Poole and the IAP and the AIPP

Ian joined the Institute of Australian Photography (now AIPP) in 1975. An interesting bit of information about Ian is that he entered the very first Merit Awards (APPA) in 1977, and was awarded a Merit for a high contrast photo of a fuzzy hairstyled, seated, saxophone player. I remember that photo well.

In reflection, I always remember Poole being involved with the AIPP in some capacity either at state division level and in the late 1980s on the National Board. During the 1980s I served with Ian on the Queensland Divisional Council and remember many council meetings at Imagery Gallery that finished with us discussing the meaning of life and photography. Together, we also contributed to the development of education and training for photography in Queensland and served on many Arts Industry Advisory Council and Curriculum development committees.


Anonymous Torsos exhibition at Imagery Gallery 1990

Early exhibitions of his work

His interest in personal photography, and in particular the female nude, led to his work being presented in exhibitions. In 1984 I curated an exhibition entitled ‘5 One man shows’ in Stephens Gallery in the Brisbane City Hall, which included a selection of Ian’s nudes. Later in 1990 his first solo exhibition ‘Anonymous Torsos’, was held in Imagery Gallery (a gallery run by myself and my mother Ruby). He also participated in many group shows in galleries in Australia and Japan.


Doug Spowart and Ian Poole with the poster for Shot from down under    PHOTO: Victoria Cooper

The Japanese connection

Ian made connections with Japanese photographers through his co-ordination of AIPP events in the early 1980s. This led to an exhibition of 13 photographers organised by Ian and hosted by artist Rick Everingham in his Brisbane studio during Expo 88. Poole followed up this exhibit with an exchange show, ‘A shot from down under’ at Design Expo in Nagoya, Diacolo Gallery in Osaka and amazingly in the Kodak Salon, the Ginza, Tokyo. Ian coordinated a tour for the participating Queensland photographers who spent about 3 weeks in Japan travelling with the exhibition, attending the openings, staying with the Japanese photographer’s families and experiencing Japanese life and landscape.


Poole+Spowart at QCP: Photo Adam Finch

Working for the Queensland Government

By the early 90s photography was changing and the Queensland Government reviewed all their departments that had employed staff photographers. They decided that only 3 photographer positions would be funded into the future. The 3 positions were advertised in the public domain and Ian, not only applied, but also won a position. It should be noted that Ian around that time completed by part-time study a Graduate Diploma of Visual Art at the Queensland College of Art. The topic of his research was portraits of artists.


Australia Council Residency and sessional teaching

Poole’s interest in the art of photography needed to be pursued alongside the day-to-day grind of professional work. After completing the Graduate Diploma he sought and was awarded and Australia Council Artist in Residency in Tokyo where he immersed himself in his passion for portraiture and Japanese culture.


Ian Poole and photobook made in a workshop with Simon Woolf with Vicky and I in 2005


Ian’s assistants, peers and mentorees

Ian always had assistants, mentored those seeking advancement of their skills, as well as sessional teaching at the Queensland College of Art and the Queensland University of Technology. His endorsement of professional practice meant that through his patronage and support many of the Institute’s significant photographers came into the AIPP fold.


Poole and the Australian Professional Photography Awards

Soon after I became Chairperson of the APPA’s in the 1990 I championed the development of judge training and the need for judges to have extended their understanding and appreciation of the art as well as professional practice.

Into this space I brought Ian Poole – he had the ideas, debating skills, knowledge and understanding of art to help with this aesthetic transformation of APPA. His dedication to ensuring that the entrant who made special works, in Ian’s opinion, got a fair hearing. I’ve spoken to many awards entrants, at all levels, and they have a story about Ian ‘going into bat’ for one of their works.

Ian skills as a judge and inspirational speaker were recognised by New Zealand Institute of Professional Photography and he became an Australian judging ambassador for the NZIPP Awards.


Ian Poole and others at Toowoomba TAFE doing final year assessments


Support for TAFE Toowoomba and Nicola’s study

As a teacher in the photography programs at the TAFE college in Toowoomba I was always privileged to have Ian and many other professional photographers and artists carry out the final holistic assessment of student work as well as endorse and support my institution.

Nicola Poole and Doug Spowart

When Ian’s daughter Nicola wanted to pursue photography Ian arranged to bring her to Toowoomba suggesting this is where she needed to be. She enrolled and over the next two years she completed her diploma studies in 2003 with the Graduating Student of the Year Award.


Team Foto Frenzy – an Impossible Project 10×8 Polaroid by Doug Spowart – RHS Ian photographs Doug

Foto Frenzy

When Ian formed Foto Frenzy with a small group of photography identities including Darren Jew, Tony Holden, Cam Attree and Susan Gravina from Brisbane Camera Hire I was honoured to open the enterprise. Later, Vicky and I were invited as Artists in Residence for a month in 2013. While we where at Foto Frenzy we participated in workshops, re-configured the premises into a camera obscura, made 10×8 Polaroid Impossible Project images and held an exhibition of our photobook and image work.


Ian Poole, Diane Byrne and Eric Victor at the State Library of Qld looking at prints by Richard Stringer

John Oxley Library donation

One of many things undertaken by Ian that many may not be aware of is his donation of his professional photography archive to the John Oxley Library at the State Library of Queensland. For quite a few years he has been going into the Library to unpack and catalogue the work so that it can be successfully searched and retrieved into the future. Now much of Brisbane’s cultural history from buildings to fashion, ballet and theatre, portraits of the rich and famous and those curious dated art-directed advertisements of the 1970s and 80s, are there as a document of our times.

I’ve been around professional photography for nearly 50 years and I’ve seen the disappearance of numerous professional photographers and their businesses – but what of their photographs? Lost? – Not Ian’s work, which he has given in an altruistic act for Queenslanders and their history.


In conclusion

I was always fascinated by Ian’s business name – ‘Ian Poole does photography’, we now know he did much more…

At this time I, and many others, will reflect on and remember Ian Poole

– his legacy will continue on in all of us.


Doug Spowart

NOTE: I hope that all this is correct – should their be any errors I am happy to make the corrections


What follows are some published works relating to Ian, some links and some other images…

Ian Poole’s website: https://poolefoto.wordpress.com/

Photo.Graphy Journal: Ian Poole Guest Editor

PHOTO.Graphy Journal – Ian Poole Guest Editor


QCP ALT Catalogue — Curated by Ian Poole

Ian Poole curated show at Qld Centre for Photography


f11 Magazine Ian Poole Folio

f11 Online magazine: Ian Poole folio


Ian Poole – On the lounge




Some images by or about Ian…


Ian Poole and Kev Hudson judging the 1982 Brisbane National Exhibition of Photography at Imagery Gallery

Doug Spowart in Imagery Gallery Darkroom by Ian Poole


Ian Poole moving out of Berry Street

Toula, Ian and Louise at the Photobook Club meeting at the Cobb & Co Museum Toowoomba

Ian and Doug at a Foto Frenzy opening

Ian Poole photographed by Wayne Radford at the exhibition End of the roid curated by Doug Spowart

Ian Poole at the opening of ICONS at the Cobb&Co Museum in Toowoomba

A Foto Frenzy opening

The opening of Foto Frenzy

An animated Ian Poole at an AIPP ‘On the lounge’

Foto Frenzy Polaroid group setup PHOTO: Victoria Cooper






Ian Poole, Glen, Asai at the opening of Floating


Farewell Ian….














NGV ART BOOK FAIR: See my books on the MomentoPro table

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NGV Art Book Fair webpage


SEE MY PHOTOBOOKS Channeling Harvey Benge and A Compendium of New Zealand and Australian Photobooks on the MOMENTOPRO table at the NGV Art Book Fair in Melbourne over March 16, 17 & 18, 2018.

MomentoPro printed my latest two books and they have them on their table as examples of the work that they do.


Libby Jeffery’s invitation to visit her table – just love the T-Shirts


Book 1.  Channeling Harvey Benge

Channeling Harvey Benge book cover

The text from the colophon:

In 2015 I was invited to make a
presentation on photobooks at the
Auckland Art Gallery as part of the
Auckland Festival of Photography.
One of my photobook heroes is
Harvey Benge who was overseas
at the time and was unable to
attend the symposium.
I documented my attendance at
the Festival and created this
personal narrative relating to my
few days in New Zealand.
This little book also doubles as
homage to Benge’s book ‘A short
history of photography’.

A MomentoPro Preview of the book can be seen here: SPOWART-Channelling Harvey Benge-book


Book 2. A Compendium of New Zealand and Australian Photobooks

The dual covers of the Photobook Compendium


A-D part of the Australian listing in the Compendium

Preface page of the COMPENDIUM

An events page in the COMPENDIUM



Hope you can visit the ART BOOK FAIR and see my books …


















VICTORIA COOPER: Loud & Luminous – Women’s Day Exhibition

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Loud & Luminous invite



LOUD AND LUMINOUS the exhibition, a celebration of Australian Women photographers, has been on show at Brunswick Street Gallery in Melbourne from 28th February – 13th March 2018 linking with International Women’s Day.

The Loud and Luminous mission concieved by Mel Anderson and Hilary Wardhaugh was to recognise and celebrate the contribution of contemporary women in the photographic arts in Australia. The exhibition has 56 emerging and influential Australian women photographers, referencing a women’s symbol in their finished work. Australian women from 9 years to 90 years contributed, with the goal to empower women of today and tomorrow.

The brief was completely open to interpretation. Artists used the figure of a woman literally or referenced it by shape or to make a statement. Each artists’ interpretation is quite unique and as a collective there is a strong message revealed.

This is a timely project and will educate and inspire women of all ages, backgrounds and disciplines by recognising the extensive cultural contribution women photographic artists make. It aims to empower the girls and women of today and tomorrow to chase in their dreams.


Victoria Cooper portrait


Artists Statement: Dreaming a River by Victoria Cooper


Influenced by Gerhard Richter’s enigmatic painting ‘Betty’, I was drawn to this photograph I made of a friend while travelling along the Danube River in Austria. It is an everyday moment but yet I find myself drawn into the reverie.

At first I struggled with the intervention of the exhibition symbolic motif, but as I contemplated my time walking beside this iconic river it was transformed through the thinking process. The motif multiplied: a thought pattern; a metaphorical weaving into a psychological fabric; or the confluence of symbolic women becoming a river.

Rather than a message or a memory of time and place, this work is embedded in the story of everyday life– of being in the world, and moments of dreaming …


Digital photomontage created for the Loud and Luminous Project World Women’s Day 2018 exhibition


Victoria Cooper talks about her work



Who is in the show…?


The opening event

The Loud+Luminous opening PHOTO: Hilary Wardhaugh

The conference



A book about the exhibition made by sponsor MomentoPro




Thank you Melissa Anderson and Hilary Wardhaugh for coming up with the idea and coordinating the project through to its conclusion.

Thanks also to the Sponsors…





Written by Cooper+Spowart

March 14, 2018 at 11:27 pm


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Cover: A Compendium of Australian & New Zealand Photobooks vPBNZ

Cover: A Compendium of Australian & New Zealand Photobooks v.PBNZ

To celebrate PHOTOBOOK NEW ZEALAND in Wellington over March 9-11 2018, I have published an updated version of my Photobook Compendium that was first issued in October 2017 at the VOLUME ART BOOK FAIR in Sydney.


Associate Professor Ann Shelton launches the Compendium @ Te Papa PHOTO: Libby Jeffery

Ann Shelton launches the Photobook Compendium PHOTO: Libby Jeffery


The Compendium is a soft cover 40 page A5 booklet that lists key contributors, both contemporary and historical, to the Australian and New Zealand photobook discipline. Apart from photographer’s names and many portraits I’ve included publishers, designers and book shops.

To extend the coverage of key aspects of the genre I have included visual coverage of significant photobook events and activities as well as portraits of many practitioners. Most of the photographs come from personal documents made in Australia, New Zealand and Vienna of these events.

The book is designed with two covers so both countries have prominence. The Compendium is printed by MomentPro and is a Numbered LIMITED EDITION of 40.

The book was launched at The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in Wellington by artist and photobook maker Associate Professor Ann Shelton on Saturday 10 at 2.00pm. At the event books will be available through Remote Photobooks.


  • Over 400 listings relating to the photobook
  • 26 portraits of photobook people
  • 50 photobook covers – exemplars of the discipline
  • 60 photographs of events
  • Australian and New Zealand Photobook of the Year winners list


The book is now SOLD OUT!  Although REMOTE PHOTOBOOKS may still have some copies

Some of the pages

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The Compendium preface by Doug Spowart

The Compendium preface




This Compendium does not attempt a definition of the ‘photobook’ – therefore to reflect the breadth and depth of this evolving medium I have considered a range of photo-based products that may include photographically illustrated books, albums, catalogues, photobooks, zines, artists books, text-only references to photography and photo ephemera.


This data and images has been compiled over many years as a result of my interest in the photobook from the historical viewpoint as well as its contemporary phenomenon. I am particularly interested in books where the photograph acts as the principal narrative agent. Additionally I am also drawn to the haptic experience and design of the book and how it operates as a vehicle for presenting ideas and telling stories.

Listed here are names of people and organisations who have contributed (both historically and recently), to the development of photobook discipline. Although most of the listings are from New Zealand or Australian residents and establishments there are some inclusions relating to itinerant or short-lived connections with this region. Some publishing houses listed may be based offshore and have a presence in this region.

I wish to acknowledge the energy and support for Antipodean photobooks provided by Libby Jeffery and the MomentoPro company. Through their patronage and sponsorship they have played a pivotal role in the building of a strong and active photobook community.

This current Compendium is published in a limited edition of 40 on the occasion of the 2nd Photo Book New Zealand Festival in March 2018. Subsequent revised versions will contain new information arising from my ongoing research.

As much of this knowledge lies hidden in personal archives and libraries, I am most interested to receive information about New Zealand and Australian photobooks and the discipline’s community of practice.

Doug Spowart

Email: Greatdivide@a1.com.au
Mail: PO Box 3063, South Brisbane, Queensland 4101, AUSTRALIA











MONTAGE+THE ARTISTS’ BOOK: a paper by Victoria Cooper

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Victoria and the ARTISTS’ BOOK YEARBOOK 2018-9


 I’ve recently had a major paper on my research into the montage and artists’ books published in the ARTISTS’ BOOK YEARBOOK 2017-8 edited by Sarah Bodman from the Centre for Fine Print Research (CFPR) at the University of the West of England. The paper covers ongoing research which was undertaken as part of my Siganto Foundation Research Fellowship at the State Library of Queensland.



Here are the first 2 paragraphs from the paper




Each time I am drawn into the montage image as a reader, I experience a liminal moment – I am at a threshold where I will enter into an unknown space. Although I may recognise familiar characteristics in each fragment I am disorientated by their juxtaposition in these hybrid images. My focus for the Siganto Research Fellowship in the Australian Library of Art (ALA) collection, at the State Library of Queensland (SLQ) is to review and study this liminal reading of the montage through the edges and joins of the fragments. In this research I am guided by the writing of Pierre Bourdieu, Roland Barthes and Sergei Eisenstein to orient myself in the reading and articulate my findings from the perspective of the reader. Also underpinning this research is the extensive history of combining, gluing, montaging, and collaging of image work in many mediums including film, photography and book making.


During my fellowship, I have reviewed over 100 artists’ books and many artists’ statements held in the ALA. The scope of this research was limited to particular works of Australian artists including Peter Lyssiotis, Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison. However selected works by British artist Helen Douglas and other international artists from the ALA collection were also considered in my research to include an international perspective. As I am a montage maker and thinker, I have decided to include some artists’ books that–although by the artist’s definition are collage– I ‘read’ as montage. My focus is on the visual ‘reading’ of the combined fragments through their edges and the spaces between. There are also considerations for the combination with mixed media including sound, photography and drawing.

This investigation does not set out to define a lexicon for montage or collage for the makeri and as such, in the writing, I will refer to the image works I am researching as montage/collage.

[i] See my blog post for the Australian Library of Art, State Library of Queensland, http://blogs.slq.qld.gov.au/ala/2016/05/27/reading-montages-perceptions-dilemmas-edges-and-resolution/


Key books that I discuss in the paper are from the following artists:

Peter Lyssiotis, Feather and Prey, (1997), Masterthief Enterprises, Melbourne

Peter Lyssiotis, Products of Wealth, (1997), Masterthief Enterprises, Melbourne

Lorelei Clark, Brisbane: River City, (2010), Lagoongrass Press, Brisbane

Jack Oudyn, The very first book of fish, (199?), Micro Press, Ormiston, Queensland

Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison, And we stood alone in the silent night, (2008), Melbourne

Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison, Salvaged Relatives, Melbourne

Lyn Ashby, 20 minutes, , (2011), ThisTooPress, Victoria

Helen Douglas & Zoe Irvine, Illiers Combray. (2004), Weproductions, Scotland

Dianne Fogwell, Gene Pool, (2000), Edition & Artist Book Studio, Canberra School of Art, Canberra


You can download a copy of my paper HERE

PLEASE NOTE: This download version contains colour photographs of the books discussed – the Yearbook is published in monochrome.


Thank you to all the artists who gave permission for their works to be photographed and presented in the publication.

Enjoy — and I would appreciate any comments you may have about the paper…


You can buy your own hard copy of the Yearbook from UWE HERE

UWE Publications website











Cabramatta: Markus Andersen & the theatricality of light

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This 500 word book review was commissioned to appear in a national journal – however, due to the commissioning editor’s resignation, was overlooked by the later appointee. I therefore publish it here…



MARKUS ANDERSEN’S BOOK – CABRAMATTA: A Moment in Time   (T&G Publishing)


On the table before me sits a book I’m about to read. A photograph of faces in a dark street appears on the cover and the semi-matte black cover image has the word ‘Cabramatta’ in large varnished san serif type. I lean forward and pick up the book and turn the opening pages. My viewing is rewarded by the usual information: title, author, publisher interspersed between blank pages and two full-page photographs. Two essays – text on white pages follow. I’ll read them later as I want to see the photographs and allow them to tell their story. I continue to turn pages and the photographs flick past as a movie of freeze-frames of urban shopping streets – raw colour, all contrasty with faces and shapes montaged against black voids.


After my first ‘reading’ I put the book face down back on the table and I reflect on what I have just encountered. Profoundly I have an experience of ‘place’, of the busy shopping precinct, a cacophony of sound and food aromas all evoked in his mash up of fleeting glimpses.

In this, Markus Andersen follows a long tradition of street photography that documents scenes of life from the familiar to the bizarre. This canon includes the work of: John Thompson (social documentary), Weegee a.k.a. Arthur Fellig (crime scene), Henri Cartier-Bresson (decisive moment), Robert Frank (American reality), William Eggleston (the democratic subject and colour), Vivian Maier (viewpoint), Mary Ellen Mark (embedded and personal). These photographs were first presented in the 1800s as albums. As documentary photography of places and events increased in popularity and readership they were published in early forms of the photobook and magazines.

My first ‘reading’ gave me a holistic view of the work. I now return to the book slowly turn the pages lingering on each photograph, looking for the connecting or underlying meanings within the meta-narrative. Each image stands alone and independent where the cohesive bond is the stilled moments of chaos in the theatricality of light.

For many, the book may simply reveal insights into the cultural nature of this Sydney suburb. However for me Cabramatta, is a celebration of Andersen’s vision as a master of light and the microsecond moment. The strength of these photographs within a visual narrative is supported by the design, sequencing and flow of the book, seems to emulate a performance on a stage. As a ‘reader’ I am placed firmly as an observer or spectator.

No doubt each reader will create their own impression of the visual material they will encounter in this book. Once more I look at the book before me. The photographer in me muses on seeing Andersen in action on the street – I imagine a patient observer with a nervous twitch – waiting, waiting. There’s a momentary splash of light filled with a face or shape, a synapse impulse … the shutter fires, in synchronicity with a meaningful moment, before the scene on the stage changes…


Doug Spowart

28 March 2017




Markus Anderson’s Cabramatta: A moment in time


T&G Publishing

295 x 250 mm




ISBN 9780987305060

Edition 1,000


ISBN: 9780987305060





The book is available through T&G Publishing’s website:



James McArdle has written about Andersen’s Cabramatta exhibition shown earlier this year at the Australian Centre for Photography … Read his ‘On this date in photography’ blog HERE











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Australian 2016 Photobooks of the Year Finalists



Photobook Club Logo



22nd September evening presents the very best of contemporary photobooks from Australia and New Zealand from the recent Photobook of the Year Awards.

Meet Libby Jeffery from the Award’s Patron MOMENTO PRO.

Come in and look at the books from 5.30pm — The viewing will close at 8.00pm.

Location: MAUD GALLERY – 6 Maud Street, Newstead, Brisbane.


ANZ Photobook Awards at Maud Gallery


TO BOOK this event do so on this Facebook page: PHOTOBOOK FRIDAY FACEBOOK EVENT



23 September – a free day of presentations about making photobooks and talking about the latest local and international photobooks.

Saturday September 23 10.30am – 4.00pm

Location: MAUD GALLERY – 6 Maud Street, Newstead, Brisbane.


Libby Jeffery – MomentoPro


At 11.00am

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Libby Jeffery from MomentoPro

Libby will talk about all things that make a difference for self publishers including:

  • Crowdfunding for projects

  • Working with editors, designers, reviewers, printers, distributors, publicists

  • The value of awards like Australian Photoboook of the Year Awards

  • Art book fairs

  • Print-on-demand services


From 1.00-4.00pm



Dane Beesley and his books

The images in Dane’s book The Road trace an unknown timeline to an unknown destination, where he appears only as a tall shadow. There’s an honesty, a quest for truth, perhaps a naiveté in the images reminiscent of cinéma vérité that captures the adolescent wanderlust it seeks to document.


David Symons and his book

David will show the ‘ins and outs’ of the work that he produced at the Siganto Foundation artists’ book workshops and a masterclass held at the State Library of Queensland earlier this year with UK artist Helen Douglas.


Neil Degney and his book You are here

The images in Neil’s book have been taken on the streets of inner city Brisbane over the years 2014 to 2017. The title references the ubiquitous wayfinding signs often found in unfamiliar environments that enable us to determine our geographical position and plan a course towards our intended destination. It is also my Instagram user name all the images have at some time been posted to Instagram. The photographs are taken with a camera phone and processed using an app called Snapseed. (Neil is scheduled in October to have the next exhibition at Maud Gallery).


Isaac Brown and his book This Rock Between Us

This Rock Between Us investigates the difficult relationship between my father and me. Hard, floating, and an unsubstantiated substance, the rock appears and vanishes from moment to moment. This handmade photobook attempts to represent the relationship as a physicality, as an object that exists ‘in-between’, and built, by my father and me.




Louis at the Obscura Festival

Louis will be presenting some photobooks he had the pleasure of reading from his recent visit to the Obscura Festival 2017, as well as his recent work-in-progress photobook An Opened Letter.


Justin Ma

In March 2017 Justin Ma was invited to do a photography workshop with Antoine D’agata in Athens, Greece. The workshop was hosted by VOID, a new organisation in Athens focussed on alternative publishing, exhibitions and workshops mainly based around photography as well as other visual arts. During the event at Maud Justin will be showing a few examples of publications from VOID including their collaboration with Antoine D’agata’s latest book “Cidade de Pedra”.


Martin Parr talking photobooks with Vicky and Doug in Vienna

Doug and Vicky will talk about their experiences at the Vienna Photo Book Festival, meeting Martin Parr and Gerry Badger and show some of the books they bought home from the Festival.









Maud Gallery sign

Thank You Maud Gallery for supporting this Photobook Club Brisbane event.







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