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Victoria Cooper+Doug Spowart Blog

DOUG’s Photobook Research: NLA FELLOWSHIP SHORTLISTING

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Doug Spowart: researcher in the Repository of the State Library of Queensland

Doug Spowart: researcher in the Repository of the State Library of Queensland

 

 

I’VE BEEN HOLDING MY BREATH FOR MANY WEEKS – waiting for an email about an amazing research opportunity at the National Library of Australia that I’d applied for and had heard, unofficially, that I had been shortlisted. A 3-month research Fellowship with access to the Library’s extensive resources, remuneration and living expenses was a possibility that was tantalisingly close. Importantly, the Fellowship would enable me to significantly enhance and create some conclusion to years of independently funded study in my chosen field of photobooks – particularly Australian photobooks.

 

A couple of days ago I received the email…

 

Dear Dr Spowart
Thank you for applying for a National Library of Australia Fellowship.  I regret to inform you that your application on this occasion was unsuccessful.  There was a large field of highly competitive applications from both established and early career researchers and from independent scholars, making selection a challenging task for the Library’s Fellowships Advisory Committee.

 

For your information I have included some components of my NLA Fellowship application.

 

TITLE: Looking into a mirror – The Australian Photobook 1970-2000

 

When we look into an Australian photobook and we see our history, our culture and ourselves. Although interest in the photobook internationally in the last 10-15 years has sparked academic research and the publication of numerous histories this has not been reflected in the Australian scene.

In 2011 NLA Harold White Fellow Dr Martyn Jolly conducted research that covered broad aspects of Australian photobook publishing with a concentration on the rise of the photographically illustrated book in the 1960s. He stated that this era: ‘…set the stage for Australia’s much better known ‘photography boom’ of the 1970s’.

This research Fellowship will address the need for research, critique and commentary to discuss the Australian form of the photobook. The resulting presentations and publications are intended to celebrate the photobooks’ special ability to provide a time capsule snapshot of political, environmental and social movements beyond Jolly’s 1960s research.

As a visual communication medium the photobook becomes a mirror to the nation through which we can see not only ourselves, but also how we present our country to the world. This research will ‘look into the mirror’, and reveal the valuable contribution that photobooks, through image and design, made in telling Australian stories.

 

 

The need for the research

In Australia the main focus of published research in photography has been of the photograph itself with scant recognition for the photographically illustrated book. This is despite the fact that the photobook, although considered as being primarily about photography, by default, also represents Australian graphic design history. Photobooks then are a collaborative product where the photograph and graphic design synergistically merge to create a sophisticated communiqué.

Dr Martyn Jolly noted in a paper published in the History of Photography journal that: The role of the photobook has been unjustly neglected in the various histories of Australian photography. However, books primarily illustrated with photographs and celebrating various aspects of Australian life and landscape – ‘Australiana’ photobooks – have been a fundamental part of the nation’s publishing industry since the 1920s.

Recently, the Art Gallery of New South Wales’ exhibition The Photograph and Australia was acclaimed as one of the largest collection of historical photographic images in Australia, and yet only only showed five photobooks. In the exhibition’s catalogue introduction Curator Judy Annear, makes no apology for what may seem as the marginalisation of the photobook but rather acknowledges that there is so much more to be done. She states in the concluding sentence that: The history of the photograph and its relationship to Australia remains tantalisingly partial; the ever-burgeoning archives await further excavation.

 

 

The research

My research will cover the date range from 1970 to 2000 and will follow on from Dr Martyn Jolly’s Harold White Fellowship area of review.

As a result of PhD research and post-doctoral work on the intersection of artists’ books and photobooks I am well positioned to review and comment on the twin perspectives of photography and book design.

 

The Aims of the research

The aim of my proposed research at the NLA will be to:

  • Provide a structural framework for the discussion of Australian photobook in the era 1970-2000;
  • Identify aspects of the Australian photobook including graphic design and narrative expression that contribute to its own unique identity in an international context;
  • Seek opportunities to identify and give prominence to photobooks and their makers; and
  • Elevate the stature of the photobook in contemporary photography and design discourse in Australia.

Aspects of the research

Aspects of the research include:

  • The presence and influence of design trends in photobooks of the era;
  • Circumstances where the photographer may have been the designer of the book as is the case with many Mark Strizic books;
  • The emergence of the artists’ book based on photography such as Peter Lyssiotis’ photomontage works;
  • Art photography and its exploration of photographic representation in the form of the book;
  • Photobooks exploring themes of Feminism;
  • Landscape photography and its alliance with environmentalism; and
  • Evidence of the emergence of land rights and Aboriginal activism through photobooks.

Other details of the application followed…

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I will apply again and for the moment continue my personally funded research.

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Until next time, the researcher awaits an opportunity…

Portrait of the author in Wilfredo Prieto's 'Untitled' (White Library) at MONA

Portrait of the author in Wilfredo Prieto’s ‘Untitled’ (White Library) at MONA

 

Written by Victoria Cooper Doug Spowart

August 16, 2016 at 2:45 pm

ALCHEMY & THE DARK ARTS – Workshops in the Maud Darkroom

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FB-Cover-Tissandier's darkroom-1000

 

Announcing a range to photo darkroom workshops that we have coming up in the new facility at Maud Creative in Brisbane…

 

Irena processing film in the darkroom

Irena processing film in the darkroom

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Irena, the gallery director, has a passion for the world of analogue photography. We have all been working together to develop a focus of fine art photography for Maud Gallery.  Last year we presented some introductory workshops in black and white darkroom titled  ‘ALCHEMY and the Dark Arts’ where we had a lot of fun with a small enthusiastic group.

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Analogue film group shoot-out

Analogue film group shoot-out

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Recently Irena has re-vamped her darkroom at the gallery transforming it to provide a facility for other enthusiasts to hone their photography craft. As part of this new initiative we have designed a series of workshops to re-invigorate the analogue world. The workshops are for small numbers to provide hands-on practical experience for participants. Additionally the darkroom will be available for hire and Maud Gallery has linked with ILFORD to supply those hard to get papers and chemicals.

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Ilford+Sink

 

The workshops are for small groups and are suitable for people wanting to learn about the art of processing and printing black and white photographs in the darkroom. These workshops may be of interest to you or you may know of someone who has an interest in this area – please feel free to pass on this email.

 

The workshops are:

 

Series 1 SEEING WHAT DEVELOPS: FILM PROCESSING

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

How to prepare and process film – participants will have one of their films processed during the workshop

SEE The workshop topics here – URL is Eventbrite.com/e/seeing-what-develops-film-processing

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Series 2 PRINTING B&W NEGS: DEMO SESSION

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is a show-n-tell session where we will work in the darkroom to make contact sheets from each participant’s negatives. Then a demonstration of print-making using basic darkroom techniques to control density and contrast will take place.

SEE The workshop topics here – Eventbrite.com/e/printing-bw-negs-demo-session

 

Series 3 DIY PRINTING: SUPERVISED PRACTICAL

In this session each participant will work with their negatives and an assigned enlarger under supervision to learn techniques to achieve excellent print results.

SEE The workshop topics here – Eventbrite.com/e/diy-printing-supervised-practical

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Series 4 PRINTING A FINE ART MASTERPIECE

 

Doug and an award winning print

Doug and an award winning print

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A full day of working with a darkroom master to create a ‘Fine Art’ print from one of their negatives. At the end of the day the print will be ready for framing.

SEE The workshop topics here – Eventbrite.com/e/printing-a-fine-art-masterpiece

 

 

Soon details of the Maud Gallery Darkroom hire will be available as well as the availability of photographic chemistries and papers. Mentored darkroom sessions will be available as well for those developing their skills in the Dark Arts.

So, do check out the details in each of the Eventbrite events above and don’t hesitate to contact us should you want some more information.

 

Cheers
Doug+Vicky

 

 

 

ADVANCE NOTICE: COME TO THE ISLAND

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Mangrove Blue – Orpheus Island 2005

Mangrove Blue – Orpheus Island 2005    PHOTO: Doug Spowart

Victoria + Doug

Victoria + Doug

 

 

“Come with us to the Great Barrier Reef’s Orpheus Island 

2-8 October 2016 for a workshop with Les Walkling …”

 

Les Walkling's Colorspace portrait – Orpheus Island 2005    PHOTO: Doug Spowart

Les Walkling’s Colorspace portrait – Orpheus Island 2005 PHOTO: Doug Spowart

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Orpheus Island Photography Workshop is a full seven day all-inclusive unique experience designed for professional photographers and enthusiast/non-professional photographers.  The James Cook University Orpheus Island Research Station is a world class research and teaching facility, and the tropical islands provide for amazing photographic opportunities.  Featured this year will be Victoria Cooper and Doug Spowart.  This is the twelfth year Les has presented this workshop and he rates it as his best.

 

The workshop comprises lectures, demonstrations and presentations each morning, backed up with hands-on work after lunch and into the evening utilizing state-of-the-art printing facilities and a fully colour managed professional workflow.

Escape the winter blues for a week on a tropical island and be inspired by an amazing photography experience with Les, Victoria and Doug. 

  • Gain creative insights and how to put the “Wow” factor into your images;
  • Explore bookmaking and fine art photography with Doug and Vicki;
  • Learn self development and marketing ideas for you and your business;
  • Polish your digital capture and advanced processing techniques;
  • Print perfect colour or black & white images every time, whether through your own printer or at your pro lab;
  • Work with our sponsors and try out their latest equipment, all types of printing media, and win lots of prizes;
  • Polish your workflow for maximum efficiency while achieving brilliant colour and the highest impact in images for your clients, your gallery, or for award competitions;
  • Experience superb underwater photography locations for snorkeling and beachcombing;

 

Check out the videos from past workshops:

 

Book now to reserve your space at Orpheus Island.

Experience the best “live in” workshop for photographers in Australia.

 

Go to:http://www.leswalkling.com/courses/orpheus-2016/

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CELEBRATING 60K VIEWS ON OUR WOTWEDID BLOG

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WHO will be the 60,000th viewer…?

 

Leave a message….

 

A couple of minutes later…   THANK YOU…!

Let us know if you’ve just visited…

 

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This morning it’s now….

 

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Written by Victoria Cooper Doug Spowart

July 9, 2016 at 6:42 pm

VICKY DISCUSSES ‘READING MONTAGES’ on the SLQ Blog

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Siganto Research Fellow Victoria Cooper

Siganto Research Fellow Victoria Cooper

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Vicky has recently posted a her latest paper about her research on the State Library of Qld’s Blog. This latest post comments on the montage and is illustrated by some interesting books from the SLQ’s Artists’ Book Collection.

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Read on or visit the post here: http://blogs.slq.qld.gov.au/ala/2016/05/27/reading-montages-perceptions-dilemmas-edges-and-resolution/

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Reading Montages: perceptions, dilemmas, edges and resolution.

Nomenclature Dilemma: Collage or Montage

In this third blog post I will share the dilemmas of encountering the blurred boundaries associated with the lexicon of these art forms, for example: What is the difference between collage and montage? Does it matter? Are there different “readings” of collage vs montage images that have been reproduced by mechanical or digital means for both wall art, or as encountered in my research, book forms? I will present an Occam’s Razor resolution arising from the considerations that inform my research to provide a path through the complexity of these issues.

Responding to terminology dilemma:

As I progress through the research I am continually confronted with terminology issues and questions regarding the nature of montage and its intersection with collage. The dilemma is with me as a kind of Sisyphean cycle where, after climbing the mountain of wondrous diversity in the Australian Library of Art artists’ book collection; I am drawn back down by the weighty issues of inconsistent terminology.

Many artists, who cut, arrange and glue disparate and/or mixed media elements refer to their work as collage or for computer made images, digital collage.  This should be the end of the debate as the etymology of collage is the French word ‘to glue’. But there are others who cut and piece together disparate elements and ‘glue’ and then fuse them within the image and refer to their process as montage (or digital montage for computer images). Also interesting to note is that the origin of the word montage is a French word meaning ‘to mount’.  Is there a need to differentiate between these similar practices? Does terminology affect the ‘reading’ of these works? In my art practice I refer to myself as a montage maker, thinker and reader and as such I bring my own perspective to reading visual narratives.

Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison, who prefer to be known as paper artists, make collage works. Their unique state artists’ books and democratic multiples in the form of zines and editions of artists’ books have a place within this discussion.
Haby and Jennison responded to my email question regarding the nature of the digital work in their book, ‘And we stood alone in the silent night’, where they state that: ‘Digital collages are made in chorus with unique state pieces. They are all a means of making, with the ‘how’ of lesser interest to us than the ‘why’ or ‘message’.

In their statement above they suggest that the means of the making is secondary to the final work. Even when the collage has been digitally scanned and then printed it remains, for them, a collage.

‘And we stood alone in the silent night’

‘And we stood alone in the silent night’

The book, ‘And we stood alone in the silent night’, presents the reader with an enchanted narrative through the composition of images and poetic texts across the pages. Underpinning the reading is the smooth and seamless joins of the elements creating a surreal landscape with a theatre of colourful inhabitants. The compositional elements draw the reader into a kind of Alice in Wonderland experience of reading: where the fused elements are arranged in a mise en page; and the turning page emulates the scenes of a paper movie (i) . The small size text comes through the reading as a poetic aside to underscore the scene.

‘And we stood alone in the silent night’

‘And we stood alone in the silent night’

Haby and Jennison’s careful cutting and pasting of added elements over or alongside the original image distinguish their broader collage work.  Again, in these works the silent edges between these interventions and the original image provide uninterrupted reading. Importantly as this transition or interval between the elements goes unnoticed the added element ultimately colonize the interior space and time of the original image.

So far in my research, I have not found many artists that tear and roughly cut their elements intentionally leaving these edges in the final montage for the reader to interpret. One example however is Lorelei Clark’s work, ‘Brisbane: River City‘.

Although the elements are fused by digital

reproduction, their roughly torn or cut edges seem to separate the elements so that the reading is disturbed much like a jump-cut (ii)  edit in a film.

'Brisbane: River City'

‘Brisbane: River City’

The elements combined in this way demand separate attention and focus on individual parts of the narrative or issue presented. As the source material may have been glossy magazines or pictorial publications, these edges could represent a critique or even an attack on social issues that affect the human condition. In many ways the reading is unsettling, rather like the political montages of Peter Lyssiotis, they shout back at the reader.

'The very first book of fish'

‘The very first book of fish’

Another example of the rough cut collage can be found in Jack Oudyn’s Book of Fish series of small books, where the original collage or paste-up can be seen in the ALA collection along with the small zine like productions. Rather than attached to the surface, the reproduction of these collages fuses the elements into the page and transforms the reading of the text and images. In these little books, the elements are submerged within the narrative and seem to float around like the flotsam and jetsam of everyday life.

Jack Oudyn 'The very first book of fish'.

Jack Oudyn ‘The very first book of fish’.

My resolve:

For the purpose of this research, I have decided to take account of how the artist defines their work as stated in the Library catalogue. As a researcher I am reliant on the information supplied by the artist, either in the form of an artist’s statement or catalogue information. This information allows a deep engagement with the work that ultimately enriches the reading experience for the researcher. Many may consider that too much information may reduce the potential for the book to be reimagined, but for readers like myself there are many ‘readings’ of an artists’ book.  As social scientist, Pierre Bourdieu suggests that an artwork is:

‘in fact made not twice, but hundreds of times, thousands of times by all those who have an interest in it, who find a material or symbolic profit in reading it, classifying it, decoding it, commenting on it, reproducing it, criticizing  it, combating it, knowing it, possessing it.’ (iii)

As mentioned earlier in this blog I refer to my work as montage, and align my methodology and inspiration with that of film and the pioneers of montage and page design from the early 20th century. In this research I have found similarities in the ‘reading’ of collages that have been either created or reproduced through mechanical or digital processes with the images created as montages. As I strive to engage with the many new ways of reading that each artist presents, any background information can take me into new spaces and places, each time I read the same book.

So rather than questioning the terminology, either a collage or montage, I am more informed by the way elements are grafted or combined; their arrangement on the page; the typography and page design. When the elements such as type, photographs, painting, drawing, found objects etc have been fused within the space of the page of the book by photomechanical, digital or another printmaking process, I will read these as a montage. As such, in the research I will consider the following:

•    whether I am seduced by nature of the smooth transition and the interval between elements is subliminal or if the torn edge focuses my attention;
•    whether the adjacency of the elements is disturbing or attacking my attempts to flow smoothly;
•    whether the transition has been digitally achieved or by hand if the information is available.

The nature of the edges of the combined visual elements within the composition is a profound aspect to reading these visual books. So rather than questioning the terminology, whether a collage or montage, I will continue in my ‘montage readings’ informed by the narratives contained within and between grafted edges.

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Victoria Cooper

 

PART 2 of this research series can be viewed here https://wotwedid.com/2016/03/19/victorias-slq-blog-post-montage-research/

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i. Lou Stoumen is the author of visual books including ‘Can’t Argue With Sunrise: A Paper Movie‘ (1975)
ii. Film makers Jean-Luke Godard and Sergei Eisenstein championed the use of discontinuity devices such as jump cuts in scenes to disrupt the flow of the cinematic narrative and create the illusion of moving through time and space. This was intended to engage the viewer proactively to think about the issues surrounding the scene.
iii. Bourdieu, Pierre. ‘The Rules of Art: Genesis and Structure of the Literary Field’. Translated by Susan Emanuel. Stanford University Press, 1996. Editions du Seuil 1992. Page 171.

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AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND PHOTOBOOKS OF THE YEAR 2015

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ANZ-LOGO

 

AUSTRALIAN + NEW ZEALAND PHOTOBOOK @ MAUD GALLERY

 

The photobook continues to capture the imagination of not just photographers but a broader community who enjoy ‘reading’ the visual nature of photostories. Part of the enthusiasm for the photobook lies in the diversity of the discipline from hand-made zines stapled together on the kitchen table to the slick graphic design of commercially printed books. The other major aspect of interest in the photobook is it’s accessibility – anyone can make his or her own book within the diverse range of practice. How then can the best books be acknowledged, rewarded and celebrated?

In Australia there have been awards for photographic books such as the Australian Institute of Professional Photography’s Photography Book of the Year Award, and more recently the Australian Photobook of the Year. This year for the first time, New Zealand photographers were able to enter their own Photobook of the Year Awards and have the ‘best’ books defined by a group of respected photobook judges and commentators on the art. An important contributor in the development of a critical evaluation structure for photobooks in Australia and New Zealand is the ongoing work being done by Australian print-on-demand service provider Momento Pro. Once again Momento Pro teamed up with Heidi Romano of Photobook Melbourne to sponsor and coordinate the Australian award. The creation of a New Zealand photobook award was also sponsored through Momento Pro’s local branch was coordinated with the organisers of this year’s inaugural Photobook New Zealand event in Wellington.

From April 14-22, under the auspices of the Brisbane Photobook Club, I coordinated an exhibition of the award winners and the finalists of both the Australian and the New Zealand Photobook of the Year Awards at Brisbane’s Maud Gallery. A special ‘launch’ event was followed by around a week of potential viewing time for those interested in seeing 26 of the ‘best’ books from our part of the world.

Conscious of the need to provide a ‘reading’ experience rather than the usual gallery ‘viewing’, Vicky and I installed the books within the gallery space on tables with chairs or stools. To highlight the winners, I chose to place these four books on plinths and therefore provide not only a prominent positioning within the space but also to allow a more intimate access the books without the visual ‘clutter’ of other displayed works and their readers.

 

The tables setup

The tables setup

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Around 60 people attended the launch event. It was an unusual gallery experience as attendees found a space at a table, sat down and began reading. Moving on occasionally to the next chair and the selection of books in close proximity. A group of students clustered around certain books discussing quietly amongst themselves the book design and narrative features that interested them. I had intended to present a welcome and a short talk about the books but chose not to as it just seemed that everyone was engrossed in the process of reading. The video made in one part of the evening shows the intensity of the ‘shush — I’m reading’ vibe permeating the gallery.

 

 

That evening, and over the following days, I had many conversations with those who had come to see the show. Many attendees enquired about technical production attributes of the books. Some seemed to have been expecting a collection of books that were of a more traditional bookshop nature. Readers noted the diversity of physical forms of the photobook, how the story was communicated and the themes pursued by these successful book award entrants. Most attendees enthusiastically accepted the opportunity to cast their vote for the People’s Choice Award.

 

ANZ Photobooks of the Year @ Maud Gallery

ANZ Photobooks of the Year @ Maud Gallery

 

An interesting topic of discussion emerging from conversations with attendees related to the current categories of entry and the characteristics of the selected books. It was noted that the awarded books and finalists from both categories seemed to blur these category perceptions. This is in part because self-publishers may create ‘trade-like’ products and trade publishers may make ‘creative style products’.

Ultimately it comes down to the question ‘Did they like what they saw?’ I would say yes… although some comments related to the seriousness of selected photobooks as they often dealt with austere, conceptual themes or raw documentary – ‘Where are the happy books?’ one reader commented.

Would they come again to another Photobook of the Year showing? I would think they would. Many indicated that they would enter the next awards…

A call for entries in the 2016 Photobook of the Year Awards will be made later in the year

 

REPORT: Doug Spowart

 

WHAT FOLLOWS ARE COMMENTS ABOUT EACH AWARD AND THE WINNERS

(Edited from the Awards’ press releases)

 

APBOTY LOGO

APBOTY LOGO

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AUSTRALIAN PHOTOBOOK OF THE YEAR AWARDS 2015

The judging panel included representatives from photography, publishing and art institutions, and was co-chaired by international art consultant and curator, Alasdair Foster, and Photobook Melbourne Director, Heidi Romano. The judges assessed the physical books for excellence in photography, layout and design, and the suitability of the format for the book’s theme and purpose, resulting in a selection of 14 finalist books.

The winners were announced at the Photobook Melbourne project space, Southbank, on 25 February. “Australian photographers are continuing to embrace the book format as a means for exploring, documenting and disseminating photography, just as locally created photography books and the artists behind them are being applauded internationally,” stated Foster. “Our finalists prove that a successful photo book does not require a major capital investment or an expensive publicity machine, but it does require a strong and engaging visual narrative in a sophisticated design, as well as genuine relationships within the photo book community.”

 

Generation AK: The Afghanistan Wars, 1993 - 2012

Generation AK: The Afghanistan Wars, 1993 – 2012 by Stephen Dupont

TRADE PUBLISHED

WinnerGeneration AK: The Afghanistan Wars, 1993 – 2012 by Stephen Dupont, Steidl –

CommendedBelanglo by Warwick Baker, Perimeter Editions, Dan Rule –

CommendedBirdland by Leila Jeffreys, Hachette

Finalists

+ The Middle of Somewhere by Sam Harris, Ceiba Foto

+ Arc by Zoe Croggon, Perimeter Editions, Asia Pacific Photobook Archive

+ Limits to Growth by James Farley, Currency Editions

 

Winner – Red Herring by Jordan Madge

SELF-PUBLISHED WINNER – Red Herring by Jordan Madge

 

SELF PUBLISHED

WinnerRed Herring by Jordan Madge

CommendedYour love is not safe with me by Ailsa Bowyer –

CommendedLA – NY by Sam Wong and Jack Shelton –

Finalists

+ By the River by Ian Flanders

+ The Smell of Narenj by Hoda Afshar

+ Magic City #2 by Chloe Ferres

+ The Moon Belongs to Everyone by Stacy Mehrfar

+ STAN by Christian Belgaux and Jack Pam

People’s Choice – The Middle of Somewhere by Sam Harris, Ceiba Foto

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NZPBOTY LOGO

NZPBOTY LOGO

 

 

THE NZPBOTY WINNERS

THE NZPBOTY WINNERS

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NEW ZEALAND PHOTOBOOK OF THE YEAR AWARDS 2015

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The judging panel, chaired by David Cook, a Senior Lecturer in photography at Massey University, Wellington, selected 13 finalist books that presented excellence in photography, layout and design, and whose format complemented the book’s theme and purpose.

“The best works presented a carefully edited selection of images, in an engaging visual narrative, with sophisticated design that didn’t overwhelm the imagery,” stated Cook, “Age and experience weren’t the defining characteristics, it was the skill of visual storytelling and the ability to combine photos with graphics, text and materials to enhance the story told by the images, to create a new artwork in its own right.”

 

NZPOTY Trade Winner_Purdom

Winner – From Certainty to Doubt by Mark Purdom

 

 

Trade Published
WinnerFrom Certainty to Doubt by Mark Purdom, Ramp Press
CommendedCreamy Psychology by Yvonne Todd, Victoria University Press
CommendedVernacular by David Straight, Potton & Burton
Finalists

New Zealand Photography Collected by Te Papa Press
Karakia by Ben Clement, Sallyann Clement, Bloom Publishing
The Imperial Body by Fiona Amundsen, split/fountain

 

F.16 G3 20/25/30 by Solomon Mortimer

F.16 G3 20/25/30 by Solomon Mortimer

 

Self Published
WinnerF.16 G3 20/25/30 by Solomon Mortimer
CommendedCascade by Shelley Jacobson
CommendedThe Inbetween by Georgia Periam
Finalists

Some kind of life in dying by Shelley Ashford
The Reality Principle by Yvonne Shaw
Waipureku by Conor Findlay
When the sun sets your eyes change colour by Solomon Mortimer & + Zahra Killeen-Chance

People’s Choice Waipureku by Conor Findlay

 

A PDF Catalogue of the New Zealand Awards is available NZPOTY 2015 Exhibition Brochure

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All photographs of books and the individual awards text supplied by Momento Pro.
Photographs @ Maud Gallery and introductory text ©2016 Doug Spowart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ODE TO TARAGO CARCAMERA OBSCURA

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Just turned 500,000 kms on the Hay Plains near Balranald, NSW

Just turned 500,000 kms on the Hay Plains near Balranald, NSW

 

 

Today I was just remembering when I first bought

the Tarago as a new car…

It was a smooth car/van in 1986 even though it was a 1985 model.

… I was its sole owner

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Although Doug was a major driver and sharer of the running costs

then there are all those kilometers we three have travelled

Doug, Me and Tarago….

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We have travelled, camped, forded flooded creeks, pushed through tracks that only

four wheel drives should go, crossed the sea (Tasmania), been invaded by possums,

carried our art, groceries, garden waste, house moving, friends, family,

and even a tour group of Japanese tourists,

Dodged kangaroos except for one that jumped into the side of us,

driven through bull dust without getting bogged,

though – monsoonal rains,

locust plagues, searing heat,

snow, sleet and frost, wild winds,

And beautiful spring days …

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Dodged crazy drivers that were talking on mobile phones while simultaneously writing

in a book resting on the steering wheel!!!!

And then there was that really big spider that walked across the windscreen while I was driving…

was it inside or outside – not sure where that ended up?

The Tarago survived break-ins back in the Imagery Gallery days in Fish Lane …

There were the breakdowns… we all have so why not CarCamera Obscura Tarago?

But Treg… you always got her going again – Thank you so much …

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Tarago suffered our singing along with the old cassette tapes

of the Travelling Wilburys, George Harrison and Pink Floyd

We planned, we imagined, we argued, we laughed, we cried, we did many things

We ate fish and chips on the Great Ocean Road …

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We made the car into a camera obscura! And drove it across Australia …

Just as we celebrated 630,000 km …

the journey for our Tarago was to end….

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We said our farewells – April 10, 2016

The Tarago CarCamera Obscura will be auctioned we were told…

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A PICTURE STORY OF OUR TARAGO CARCAMERA OBSCURA

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Wooli Camera Obscura with the Tarago

Wooli Camera Obscura with the Tarago

TRAVELLING LIGHT-Invitation from the Qld Centre for Photography show

TRAVELLING LIGHT-Invitation from the Qld Centre for Photography show

630,000 km - the final reading

630,000 km – the final reading

Frontpiece for the Photospace exhibition at the Australian National University

Frontpiece for the Photospace exhibition at the Australian National University

Transcontinental Crossing graphic

Transcontinental Crossing graphic

The CarCamera Obscura in the Ottway Ranges

The CarCamera Obscura in the Ottway Ranges

The Tarago at the Combo Water Holes near Winton

The Tarago at the Combo Water Holes near Winton

The CarCamera Obscura folio was a finalist in the LEICA CCP Photodocumentary Awards

The CarCamera Obscura folio was a finalist in the LEICA CCP Photodocumentary Awards

CarCamera Obscura graphic - how it works...

CarCamera Obscura graphic – how it works…

The CarCamera photographed as a projection @ Bundanon in 2007

The CarCamera photographed as a projection @ Bundanon in 2007

A CarCamera Obscura on the Barkly Tablelands 2005

A CarCamera Obscura on the Barkly Tablelands 2005

Negotiating a hairpin bend at Mt Buffalo, Victoria

Negotiating a hairpin bend at Mt Buffalo, Victoria

 

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